Roll of Honor

Fannin Veterans who died in uniform during World War II
All gave some, but some gave all.

We add names of Camp Fannin veterans who died in uniform during World War II and make corrections continuously to our Roll of Honor as new information is provided. If you have personal knowledge of the death in uniform of someone not currently on the Roll who served at Camp Fannin, please nominate him or her for membership in the Camp Fannin Roll of Honor. You may fill out the form below or e-mail your request to campfannintexas@yahoo.com. Also, please notify us at the same address whenever you find a broken link or other aberration.

The Camp Fannin Roll of Honor lists only the names of Camp Fannin veterans whose deaths in uniform during World War II have been documented. We waited until 1991 to form a Camp Fannin Association, which triggered creation of the Roll. Had we acted in 1951 or 1961, we would have had access to a vastly greater body of information and our Roll of Honor would include perhaps hundreds of additional names. But we’re still trying and maybe one day we’ll stumble upon a lode which to this point has never been discovered despite patient, systematic search. Meantime, we continue to add names which come in- slowly, to be sure, but steadily.

The first Roll, published in the Spring 1995 issue of the Association newspaper, Camp Fannin Guidon, listed 26 names. The most recent issue, dated 4 February 2016, contains 245 names. We are especially grateful to Terry Hirsch of Indianapolis, Indiana who provided us a list of 14 additional Camp Fannin heroes in June 2015, and additional information on two men previously listed, Frederick B. Coldicott and Rufus Smith.

It is important to note that trainees were not the only Fannin veterans killed in uniform in World War II. Cadre were regularly reassigned to combat units, and a number of cadre members are to be found on our Roll of Honor, including Col. Martin Barndollar, who was killed in Normandy July 4, 1944. He had been commander of the Camp Fannin Branch Immaterial Replacement Training Center (BIRTC) before it was redesignated Camp Fannin Infantry Replacement Training Center (IR TC).

One thing that has always been a worry to Camp Fannin Association is our inability to find the names of everyone who should be on our Roll of Honor. It would seem at first glance that chances of ever having a complete Roll are waning with the ever-accelerating rate of mortality of Fannin vets. But there are very real reasons to hope that we will be able to add dozens if not hundreds of names before we’re done.

Camp Fannin Roll of Honor

Available information is identified by the following alphabetical code:

a) hometown or state;
b) dates and unit at Camp Fannin;
c) date and place of death;
d) unit assignment at time of death;
e) circumstances of death;
f) places of burial (temporary and permanent);
g) name and relationship of person(s) submitting information;
h) miscellaneous information (awards, age at death, etc.)

ABNEY, Samuel Bruce

ABNEY, Samuel Bruce, PFC, 38682304, DOB 1925. a) Emory, Texas, b) 1944, 13th Regt. c) 2 Jan 1945, Behren, France, about six miles east of Saarbrucken, Germany. d) Co. F, 411th Inf Regt, 103rd Inf Div. e) Samuel was given the mission of furnishing protection for a group of tank destroyers. While advancing toward the enemy lines, the entire task force was subjected to intense enemy fire, pinning them to the ground and necessitating their withdrawal. It is believed that Samuel was wounded and unable to withdraw when the order was given. As this action took place in enemy territory, a search for Samuel could not be made. A few days later, this territory was taken by our troops, but Samuel could not be found. f) Smyrna Community in Rains County, Emory, Texas. g) Sister, Ruth Gowin, Rt. 2, Box 150, Emory, Texas 75440; 903-473-2660. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

ADAMS, Alfred J.

ADAMS, Alfred J., Cpl., 33581526. DOB 2/29/24. a) Yeadon, Pennsylvania. c) 9 November 1944, west of Falquemont, France, on approach to Maginot Line. d) I/317/80. e) Stanton: ‘The division attacked across the Seille River 8 November 1944 with three regiments abreast It advanced despite mud, mines, and highway congestion to seize a bridge at Faulquemont over the Neide Allemande River on 20 November 1944. g) Joe Adams, nephew, 7283 Valley Avenue, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19128. jaaOOl l@verizon.net, who wants to hear from anyone who knew his uncle. h)Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

ALTIS, Iva! H.

ALTIS, Iva! H., PFC, 38568370, DOB 1914. a) Blackwell, OK: grew up in Missouri, b) May 1944 ,A/57/12. c) 5 Oct 1944, Hurplemont, France. d) K/141/36. e) Member of a night reconnaissance patrol which made its way to within 15 yards ofan enemy machine gun nest g) Daughter, Imogene Woods, 1167 West Shawnee Street, Springfield, Mo. 65810-2294. h) Played piano and mandolin, wrote a beautiful piec,e called “Sunset At Sea” on the boat going over. Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

AMICK, Lynn Bernard

AMICK, Lynn Bernard, PFC, 37682024, DOB 10/17/10. a) Colome, South Dakota. b) Winter 1943-44. c) 16 November 1944, near St. Die in the Vosges Mountains, France. d) E/409/103. e) Stanton: The 103rd Infantry Division arrived at Marseille, France on 20 October 1944 and relieved the 3rd Infantry Division at Chevry 8-9 November 1944. It attacked toward St. Die in the Vosges Mountains 16 November 1944 and fought through strong opposition to clear the hill mass below the town. f) Epinal American Cemetery, Epinal, France, Plot A, Row 11, Grave 6 g) Tiffany K. Weidner, 7th Grade, Colome Junior High School, Colome,South Dakota. h) Go to <http://jr016.k12.sd.us/amick.htm> for additional information. Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

APITZ, Harold Arthur

APITZ, Harold Arthur, Pvt., 37600391, DOB 28 February 1925. a) Henderson, Sibley County, Minnesota. b) July-September 1944. This was an abbreviated basic training cycle due to urgent demand for replacements. c) 9 February 1945, in vicinity of Udenbreth in the Seigfried Line,. Germany. d) A/393/99. e) Having played a historic role in stopping the German Counteroffensive in the Battle of the Bulge, the 99th Division pursued the retreating Germans relentlessly through deep snow, mountainous terrain, frigid cold, minefields, and deadly fire from pillboxes, and suffered heavy casualties. See also on the web “A pictorial account of the 393rd Infantry Regiment in combat.” f) Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery, Belgium, Plot C, Row 11, Grave 60. g) Terry Hirsch <teresabirsch@yahoo.com>; Peter Schouteten and Ruth Ann Buck of the Dutch non-profit organization Foundation United Adopters American War Graves .. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge. Picture at right with mother during furlough December 12-21, 1944. Posted 19 June 2015.

ARMOUR, Herbert C.

ARMOUR, Herbert C., Pvt., 34988565. a) Southaven, Mississippi. b) May-July 1944. c) 10 Feb 1945, near Trier, Germany, near Luxembourg border shortly after crossing Sauer River. d) K/417/76. e) 40mm mortar round landed in foxhole Herbert and another soldier were sharing. f) Buried in Luxembourg cemetery, later moved. g) Brother, H. Frank Armour, 794 Alleghany Cove, Southaven, Mississippi 38671. h) 417th Regt. part of 417th RCT which received a presidential citation “for outstanding performance of duly in action against the enemy from 7 to 12 February 1945 in the vicinity of Echternach, Luxembourg.” Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

ARMSTRONG, Lloyd E.

ARMSTRONG, Lloyd E., PFC, 38629842. a) Navarro County, Texas. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666.

BAILEY, Joe Wilson

BAILEY, Joe Wilson, PFC, 38671835, DOB October 1, 1908. a) Elgin, Texas. b) Spring 1944. c) 24 Dec 1944.one mile southeast of Manhay, Belgium. d) Co. B, 48 Armd Inf Bn, 7 Armd Div. e) Rifleman with antitank platoon. His squad was defending roadblock when enemy laid down barrage on his position and squad ordered to withdraw. He was not present when squad was reorganized. f) Later determined that his remains had been recovered by enemy and buried in German Military Cemetery, Ittenbach; reinterred 30 Jul 63 Fort Sam Houston Military Cemetery. San Antonio, Texas, g) Walter E. Bailey, brother, Bastrop. Texas, and Ailene Bailey Kelley, niece. Route 1, Box 361-9, Hawkins, Texas 75765. Additional information provided by Wesley Johnston, Historian, 7th Armored Division Association, whose splendid website, 48b-1944-12.htm, continues to express doubts about the reported fate of the 34 men including Joe Wilson Bailey of Company B, 48th Armored Infantry Battalion reported MIA as of 24 December 1944. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

BAIRD, Edgar W.

BAIRD, Edgar W., Pvt., 36977305, DOB 26 April 1909. a) Marysville, St Clair County, Michigan. b) between May-November 1944. c) 8 February 1945, vicinity Obermehlen, Germany. d) I/3/22/4. e) Stanton: On 17 January 1945 the 87th Division took over the 4th Division’s zone along the Sauer from Echremach to Wasserbilling, releasing the 4th Division to seize the heights overlooking the Our and cross the river at Bettendorf 22 January 1945. It resumed the offensive 29 January 1945 and advanced into Gennany 1 February, breaching the outer defenses of the West (& Wall along the Schnee Eifel River near Brandscheid on 4 February. On the 9 February the division crossed
the Pruem River. f) American Military Cemetery, Henri-Chapelle, Belgium, Plot F, Row 14, Grave 51. g) Terry Hirsch <teresahirsch@yahoo.com>; Peter Schouteten and Danny van der Groen of the Dutch non-profit organization Foundation United Adopters of American War Graves; daughter Violet Baird. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

BAKER, Ernest E.

BAKER, Ernest E., Pvt., 35769514. a) Charleston, West Virginia. b) Fall 43-Spring 44, C/78/16. c) 23 June 44, France. f) U. S. Military Cemetery, St. Laurent, France, Plot M, Row 10, Grave 182; re-interred near Charleston, W. Va. g) Winston A. Bailey. 27211 Cranford Lane, Dearborn Heights, Michigan 48127, who grew up with deceased in Charleston, W. Va. and was at Fannin at same time. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

BARILE, William, PFC.

BARILE, William, PFC., 35929638, DOB 7/17/1912. a) Mahoning County, Ohio. b) 1944. c) 10 May 45, near Balete Pass, Luzon, Philippines. d) 126/32, attached to 25th Division at time of death. e) Stanton: The 25th Infantry Division made a contested three-pronged drive on Balete Pass. The division was reinforced by the 148th and 126th Infantry but the Pass was not taken until 13 May 45 after a fierce battle for Kapintalan Ridge. f) Arlington National Cemetery. g) Katherine A. (Mrs. Earl) Park, 12821 McGowan Drive, Tyler, Texas 75707-9665, from Dedication Biographies, 1946 Raven Annual, Youngstown, Ohio. Additional information acquired in November 2009 from Internet posting by Anne Cady. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

BARNDOLLAR. Martin D., Jr.

BARNDOLLAR. Martin D., Jr., Col., 0-007030. a) Everett, Pennsylvania. b) 29 May-3 Aug 43, commanding officer ‘ Camp Fannin Branch Immaterial Replacement Training Center. c) 4 Jul 44, Carentan sector, Normandy. d) Commanding 33lstRegt, 83rd Div. e) From Breakout and Pursui U.S. Anny in World War II: “To advance down the Carentan-Periers road, the 331 st Infantry was to attack along the right of the highway … The 83rd fired a ten-minute artillery preparation and jumped off at daybreak … Two hours later, Colonel Bamdollar was dead with a bullet below his heart.” g) Statement on page 25 of Gordon Neilson’s book, Camp Fannin, Texas: A Fitly-Year Perspective-, death reported in 3 Aug 44 issue of Camp Fannin Guidon. h) The colonel’s wife Esther well remembered by Camp Fannin Association’s corresponding secretary, Viola Errett, a friend at Fannin. Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

BARNHILL, Lucian A.

BARNHILL, Lucian A., 1st Lt., 0-513998. a) Brooksville, Mississippi. b) 1944, A/82, 2nd Lt., platoon leader. c) 20 December 1944, between Saarlautern bridgehead and the Waldbilling/Haller area. d) 10th Reg., 5th Div. e) Stanton: On 16 December 1944, the Gennan Ardennes counteroffensive began, and the 5th Inf Div. relieved the 95th Inf Div. at the Saarlautem bridgehead, attacking out of it 18 December 1944. After slow progress Waldbilling and Haller fell 25 December 1944. Lt. Barnhill was killed by a German sniper. f) Lorraine American Cemetery, St. Avoid (Moselle), France, Plot A, Row 30, Grave 25. g) Merle W. Kribbs, 6331 County Road 385, Dublin, Texas 76446-4132, who writes “Lt. Barnhill was my training officer during the early part of 1944. I remember him so well because he made me dig a foxhole in a rocky creek bed because I failed to fire my rifle.” h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge

BEALE, Robert E.

BEALE, Robert E., Pvt, 38687394. a) Navarro County, Texas. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666.

BEARD, Marvin

BEARD, Marvin, Pv1., 38642487, date of birth 1916. a) Timpson, Texas. b) March-June 1944, A/66/14. c) September 16, 1944, Saint-Pierre, on the outskirts of Brest, France. d) Company I, I 15th Regt, 29th Infantry Division. e) Stant.on: The 29th Division was moved west from Nonnandy by mot.or int.o Brittany t.o positions outside the fortress of Bres which it began attacking August 25, 1944. An all-out assault on the city began September 8 and Gennan resistance collapsed September 18. t) U.S. Military Cemetery, St James, France, Plot N, Row 5, Grave 118; brought home in April 1949 and re-buried at Cold Springs Cemetery, Garrison, Texas. g) Niece, Becky Palmer, 10210 FM 16E, Tyler, Texas 75706. h) Father of three at the time of his death. Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

BERRY, Charles J.

BERRY, Charles J., PFC, 33664117. a) Virginia. c) 3 March 45. d) 310/ 78. f) Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery, Belgium, Plot D, Row 12, Grave 26. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

BIEN, Lonnie Lester

BIEN, Lonnie Lester, Pvt., RA 38536596. a) Brownwood, Texas, b) 1943, D/59/12. c) 5 August 1944, Chattanev, France. d) B/329/83. e) Stanton: The division landed across Omaha Beach on 19 June 1944 and attacked against strong opposition toward Periers 4 July 1944. St. Eny fell 9 July 1944 and the division regrouped along the Ays River 15 July 1944. The division renewed its attack 26 July 1944 as part of the Operation Cobra breakout, and in heavy combat crossed the Taute River the next day. After consolidation, the division followed the 6th Armored Division and reached the fortified city of St. Malo 4 August 1944. It began the Battle of St. Malo the same day and forced back German defenders to the strongpoints of The Citadel and Dinard after combined assaults. f) St. James American Cemetery south of Avranches, Plot A, Row 10, Grave 246; re-buried in 1948 at Greenleaf Cemetery, Brownwood, Texas 76801. g) Son, R. L Bien, 101 Oak Grove, Boerne, Texas 78006-1734, who remembers attending his father’s funeral in Brownwood at age 5. Would like to hear from anyone who has information about his father’s service and death. h) Bronze Star Medal (left), Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

BISSEN, Henry

BISSEN, Henry, PFC, 30110928. a) Hawaii. c) 29 April 45. d) 407/102. f) Netherlands American Cemetery, Margraten, Plot C, Row 7, Grave 3. g) Carl A. Settle. 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton. Virginia 23666. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

BLANK, Russell Davis

BLANK, Russell Davis, Jr., PFC, 35833090, DOB 5/8/1918. a) Mahoning County, Ohio. c) 27 Jan 45, Vicinity of Sarreguernines, France. d) 71/44 Inf. Div. e) Stanton: The Gennan Nordwind Counteroffensive strock the 44th Infantry Division eastof Saneguemines on 1 January 1945 and drove it back to the Rimling vicinity, the Gennan forces retaking Gros Rederching and re-entering Aachen on 3 January before their advance was halted. The division’s efforts to regain ground were stopped on a line extending along the Boies de Blies Brucken to just north of Gros Rederching. t) Forest Lawn Memorial Park Cemetery, Youngstown, Ohio. g) Katherine A. (Mrs. Earl) Park, 12821 McGowan Drive, Tyler, Texas 75707-9665. from Dedication Biographies, 1946 Raven Annual, Youngstown, Ohio. and Shane Olsen. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge. Updated 8 August 2013.

BLANQUART, William E.

BLANQUART, William E., T/5, 31348229. a) Berkshire County, Massachusetts. b) August-November 1943. c) Pacific area. g) Dr. Leo Jensen, 195 Horseshoe Circle, Athens, Georgia 30605-3423. They were in same training cycle at Fannin. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

BOHNHOFF, Carl Joseph Sr.

BOHNHOFF, Carl Joseph Sr., Pvt, 38499694_ a) Louisiana b) 1944, N68. c) June 13, 1944, nearCaumont, France. d) 26th Regiment, I st Infantry Division. e) Stanton: The 1st Infantry Division assaulr.ed Omaha Beach on D-Day June 6, 1944 in the face of fierce opposition. The 16th Infantry Regiment reached the St Lo-Bayeux highway June JO and the 18th and 26th Regiments seized Gaumont June 13. t) Normandy American Cemetery, Colleville-sur-Mer, France, Plot J, Row 13, Grave 14. g) Only grandchild, Mrs. Sheryl Raffat Saeed, Sheldon, Harris County, Texas. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

BONSIGNORE, Salvatore

BONSIGNORE, Salvatore, Pvt. b) Aug-Dec 43, A/81. c) 20 Oct 44, Leyte, P.I. g) Eric Diller, 504 Via La Selva, Redondo Beach, CA 90277; (310) 375-2024; eddiller@earthlink.net; in same barracks with deceased at Camp Fannin. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

BRANDEL, Otto J.

BRANDEL, Otto J., Pvt., 37644661. a) Brinktown, Missouri. b) August-December 1944. c)13 March 1945, Mindanao, Philippine Islands. d) 41st Infantry Division. e) Stanton: The 41st Infantry Division departed Biak Island by echelon 29 January-1 February 1945 and disembarked at Mindoro, Philippine Islands 8-9 February 1945. The 186th Infantry Regiment assaulted Palawan island 28 February 1945, took Puerto Princessa and its airfields, seized Hill 1445 on 8 March 1945, and eliminated Japanese mountain positions until returned to division control at Zamboanga, Mindanao on 27 March 1945. The division had landed on Zamboanga Peninsula on Mindanao 10 March 1945 and captured Zamboanga city and Caldera Point quickly, but Mt. Capison was not taken by the 162nd Infantry until 24 March 1945. When the 163rd Infantry gained the heights near Mt. Pulungbatu 29 March 1945, organized resistance ended. f) Holy Guardian Angels Cemetery, Brinktown, Missouri. g) Nephew, Ben Duggan, 21511 Highway 17, Waynesville, Missouri 65583. h) Otto had been in the Army just over seven months when he was killed. Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

BREWER, Paul

BREWER, Paul, Pvt., 35772078, DOB May 1, 1925 a) Stirrat, Logan County, W. Va. b) Sept 43-Feb 44, C/52/11. c) September 14, 1944, near the village of Montipoli, in the mountains of Italy. d) 361st Inf. Regt., 91st Inf Division. e) Stanton: The 91st Division crossed the Sieve River on September 10, 1944, going into the attack at M. Calvi, Monticelli, and Altuzzo on Septmber 12. The division was heavily engaged in this assault on the Gothic Line as the 361st and 363rd fought the Battle for M. Monticelli 12-18 September. See also 361st Infantry Gothic Line Campaign. (f) Hatfield and McCoy Cemetery, Town of Sarah Ann, Logan County, W. Va. g) Winston A. Bailey, 27211 Cranford Lane, Dearborn Heights, Michigan, who grew up with deceased in Charleston, W. Va. and trained in the same squad at Fannin. Additional information provided by Shane Olson of Hallock, Minn. and Nancee Russell, address not known. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

BROWN, Bob H

BROWN, Bob H., Sg t, 35618875, DOB 1920. a) Shawnee County, Kansas. b) first training cycle 1943. c) 20 November 1944, in the vicinity of Schleiden-Nicdermerz, Germany. d) L/3/175/29. e) Stanton: The 29th Division began the offensive for the Roer 16 November 1944 with the 115th amd 175th regiments leading. Setterich was taken by the 116th Inf. after heavy combat 19 November, ei1abling the 2nd Annored Division to push through. The 175th Regiment took and Jost Bourheim and then recaptured it and held it in the filce of strong Gennan counter attacks 23 November. t) Netherlands American Cemetery, Margraten, Netherlands, Plot D, Row 4, Grave 29. g) Terry Hirsch, Indianapolis, Indiana; Peter Schouteten and Erwin Derhaag, Margraten, Netherlands. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

BROWN, Earle Taylor, Jr.

BROWN, Earle Taylor, Jr., Sgt., 31358166. a) Massachusetts. b) Summer 43. c) 11 Dec 44 near Pier, Germany, near the Roer River. d) A/414/104 e) Stanton: The 104th Infantry Division crossed the Inden River at Lucherberg by surprise attack on 2 December 1944 and established a bridgehead which was subjected to strong German counterattacks 3-5 December. The division renewed its offensive 10 December to clear the west bank of the Roer, and the 414th fought the Battle for Pier 10-12 December 1944. f) Netherlands American Cemetery, Margraten, Netherlands, Plot A, Row 15, Grave 23. g) B. D. Chism, P.O. Box 254, Emory, Texas 75440, best friend. Further information provided by Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666. h) Silver Star (left), Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

BROWN, John Hartse!

BROWN, John Hartse!, PV1., 38573235, DOB 17 October 1924. a) Dustin, Oklahoma b) October 1944-February 1945, A/64/13 c) 30 May 1945, east ofWawa Dam, Rizal province, Luzon, Philippine Islands. d) Ul51/38. e) Excerpts from a letter to John’s wife from a fellow soldier, Dick Bakken: “The night before he got killed I slept in the foxhole with him. About II o’clock next morning we ran into a whole bunch of Japs. John was thefirstscoutofour squad. We laid still for a long while. When we got up and started to move again, he got hit. He didn’t say a word and fell. Philippine Islands John died, instantly. Plot He Row didn’t 12, suffer Grave any.” 1455. f) First Re-buried buried Dustin at U.S. Cemetery, Armed Forces Dustin, Cemetery Oklahoma. #2, g) Manila, Earnest Luzon,James I, Brown, son, 443 Walnut Street, Kiefer, Oklahoma 74041. h} Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge, Philippine Liberation ribbon (shown in accompanying picture). Posted 19 September 2013

BROZ, Albert James

BROZ, Albert James, PFC, 37490921, DOB May 19, 1926. a) Iowa. c) 1 May 1945, Okinawa. d) 306/77. e) Stanton: The 306th Infantry Regiment of the 77th Infantry Division landed on Okinawa 27 April 1945, and the 77th Division relieved 96th Infantry Division on 30 April. The 307th Infantry used cargo nets and ladders in the Battle for Maeda Escarpment but then came under heavy Japanese fire from the reverse slope. The 306th Infantry was subjected to a strong Japanese counterattack. f) Honolulu American Memorial Cemetery, Plot F, Row 1, Grave 295. g) daughter, Deanne Broz Beadle, <teadled@live.com> h) Bronze Star Medal (left), Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

BRUMFIELD, Ray W.

BRUMFIELD, Ray W., Pvt., 35817320. a) Lexington, Kentucky. b) Sept-Dec 1944, 58/12. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666, a fellow-trainee at Fannin.

BULLARD, Kenneth, S.

BULLARD, Kenneth, S., PFC 31378758. a) Hartford County, Connecticut. b) Aug-Dec 43, A/81. c) June, 1944, Omaha Beach, Normandy. g) Eric Diller, 504 Via La Selva, Redondo Beach, CA 90277; (310) 375-2024; eddiller@earthlink.net; in same barracks with deceased at Camp Fannin. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

BURD, James D.

BURD, James D., l’t Lt, 01050575. a) Steuben County, New York. c) March 26, 1945, vicinity Dinslaken, Germany. d) G/l34/35. e) Movement from the Rhine River to an objective in the vicinity of Dinslaken between 0800 and 1530, contested by considerable 20mm and direct artillery fire. f) Woodlawn Cemetery, Canisteo, New York. g) Steven H. Sherman, 3rd cousin, 1316 Bluebird Trail, Copperas Cove, Texas 76522. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

BURKHAMMER, James F.

BURKHAMMER, James F., PFC. c) Wounded in action 14 April 1945 and died on 16 April. g) Terry Hirsch, Indianapolis, Indiana. Post.ed 3 February 2016. Additional infonnation to come.

BURKLOW, John Ray

BURKLOW, John Ray, Private First Class, 38607507, DOB 8 March 1924. a) Nolan County, Texas. b) A/57. c) 22 September 1944, near Firenzuola, Tuscany, Italy. d) 363rd Infantry Regiment, 9 I st Infantry Division. e) Allied forces had just succeeded in breaching the formidable mountainous Gothic Line, with the 363rd Regiment having driven north through Monticelli in the preceding days. f) Florence American Cemetery and Memorial, Florence, Toscana, Italy, Plot G, Row I, Grave 23. g) Dana Kristin Russell, grandniece, russell.family.tx@gmail.com. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

BUTLER, Bobbie

BUTLER, Bobbie 0., Pvt. 38555126. a) Texas. c) 2 July 44. d) 116/29. f) Normandy American Cemetery, Colleville-sur-Mer, France. g) Bart J. Engram, 1214 McLynn Avenue NE, Atlanta, Georgia 30306. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

CABRAL, John

CABRAL, John, PFC, 39147583, DOB 1916. a) Oxnard, California. b) 1944. c) March 25, 1945, at the Rhine River in the Buderich-Wallach-Rheinberg area. d) Co. A, 1st Bn., 117th Regt., 30th Infantry Division. e) Stanton: The 30th Division assaulted across the Rhine with three regiments abreast March 24, 1945 in the Buderich-Wallach-Rheinberg vicinity after heavy artillery shelling of German positions. It made contact with the British 1st Commando Brigade the next day and pushed through heavily-defended wooded terrain. f) Netherlands American Cemetery, Margraten, Holland. g) Antoine Nouens, <bulge@hotmail.com>, a citizen of Holland, who lives near the cemetery. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

CAGNEY, Joseph Philip

CAGNEY, Joseph Philip, PFC. , 36675636, DOB 8/10/24. a) Oak Park, Illinois. b) August- November, 1943, A/63/13. c) 30 Oct 44, Catmon Hill, Leyte, P.I. d) K/381/96. e) Participated in land invasion of Leyte where he was wounded 29 Oct 44 and died of his wounds next day. Awarded Bronze Star for heroic action against enemy. Stanton: The 96th Infantry Division arrived in Hawaii 23-31 July 1944, and trained on Oahu where it prepared for operations on Yap. The division moved to Eniwetok Island 11 September 1944 and was informed its participation in the Yap operations was cancelled 15 September 1944, and it was diverted to Leyte Island, Philippines instead. The division remained afloat at Eniwetok Anchorage until departed 28 September 1944 for Manus Island, where it arrived 3 October and there remained afloat until leaving for Leyte 14 October. The Division landed near Dulag 20 October and took San Jose and advanced inland across swampy terrain against pillboxes, the 381st and 383rd Regiments fighting at Catmon Hill 21-29 October 1944. f) Military cemetery, Leyte, P.I., reinterred Queen of Heaven Cemetery, Hillside, Illinois, Lot 25, Block 1. g) Jim Cagney, brother, 296 Country Club Drive, Prospect Heights, Illinois 60070. h) Bronze Star Medal (left), Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge, and Philippine Unit Citation Badge.

CARMEN, James

CARMEN, James. a) Mt. Vernon, Indiana. b) Aug-Dec 44. c) 1945, European Theater of Operations. g) Richard Hawkins, P.O. Box 992, Atascadero, California 93423.

CASTRO, Salomon

CASTRO, Salomon, S/Sgt., 38579911, DOB 10/17/10. a) El Paso, Texas. b) 1944, C/68/12. c) 5 March 1945, Germany. d) 12/4. e) Stanton: “On 28 February 1945 the 4th Division crossed the Pruem River in force. Gondelsheim was taken 4 March 1945 and the division raced out of the Pruem bridgehead behind the 11th Armored Division to the Kyll 6 March 1945.” f) American Cemetery in Belgium, reinterred Ft. Bliss National Cemetery, Texas 29 April 1949. g) Luis Castro, son, 22905 Wren St., Grand Terrace, Calif. 92313-5558. Further correspondence with Sgt. Castro’s great-granddaughter, Kayla Castro, 11407 Turko Avenue, Hesperia, California 92345. h) 33-year-old father of eight when drafted. Killed at age 34. Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

CHARGO, Sylvan

CHARGO, Sylvan, PFC, 37575756. b) Fall-Winter 43-44, B/55/11. c) 7/15/44, Normandy, France. d) Company M, APO 15186. e) Three men in a machine gun platoon were on patrol at night. Their assignment was to wipe out an enemy machine gun nest. As the three approached the enemy in the dark with hand grenades as their weapons, two machine guns opened fire and Sylvan was the only one directly in their path. One of the other men was wounded, the third one unscratched. f) La Cambe, Normandy. g) Kim Groff, 6414 Shoreline Drive, Little Elm, Texas 75068, <kgroff@sbcglobal,net>, discovered letter while researching in Whiteman home in Tyler. h) Mrs. Whiteman wrote Sylvan a letter on D-Day, June 6, 1944. It was the one returned with the handwritten notation “Deceased 7-15-44. Sylvan had also written Mrs. Whiteman a letter on D-Day, and it is printed along with several others in Mrs. Groff’s book titled The Fitzgerald House (see page 2). h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

CHARLES, Avery T.

CHARLES, Avery T., Sgt., 35108617 a) Washington County, Indiana b) Fall 1943-Spring 1944, cadre 63/13. c) ETO (Battle of the Bulge). g) J. D. Henley, 12321 Swanson, Marana, Arizona 85653, trainee in deceased’s Fannin outfit. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

CLAPP, Kenneth F.

CLAPP, Kenneth F. , Pvt., 31388725 a) Winchendon, Mass. b) Aug-Dec 1943. c) 18 June 1944, France. g) Leon St. Pierre, 3325 Blain Place, Tyler, Texas 75701; They were high school classmates and took basic at the same time at Fannin though in different outfits; visited several times during basic. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

CLOVER, Philip E.

CLOVER, Philip E., Sgt., 38691546 a) Grant County, Oklahoma b) Spring 1944. c) 1/28/45, Luxembourg. d) 10th Regt., 5th Inf. Div. e) The Fifth Division, deeply enmeshed in the Battle of the Bulge, made a surprise crossing of the Sauer River near Diekirch, Luxembourg on January 18, 1945, and by the end of the Battle of the Bulge [January 25] the Division had driven north to the Our River. Sgt. Clover had survived the Bulge, but died within the week as the 5th continued its drive east into Germany. g) Brad Clover, son, 106 Carlisle, Enid, OK 73703. h) Son Brad Clover wrote: “My mother, my brother, and I came to Tyler to be near my dad, and my mother did washing and ironing for some of the men in my dad’s barracks. I would like to hear from anyone who served with my dad at Fannin or in Europe under Patton.” Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

COLDICOTT, Frederick Bryan

COLDICOTT, Frederick Bryan, Pvt., 36960241, DOB 10/22/1921. a) Roseville, Michigan. b) March-Aug 44. c) 10/22/44 Wurselen, Germany. d) 120/30. e) Assault on Siegfried Line. f) American Military Cemetery, Margraten, Holland, Grave 22, Plot L, Row 9. g) D-Day In South Limburg – A Diary of Liberation published in Holland in memory of the liberators. h) Pvt. Coldicott died on his 23rd birthday, a day after the capitulation of Aachen. He was born in England and came to America with family at age of 3. Had a private pilot’s license. Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

CORNFORTH, Lorraine H.

CORNFORTH, Lorraine H., Pfc., 39933049, DOB January 27, 1925. a) Aberdeen, Idaho. b) Summer-Fall 1944. c) 11 March 1945, Stiring Wendel, France. d) K/274/70. e) Stanton: The 274th and 275th Regiments cleared the heights commanding both Saarbruecken and Stiring Wendel by 24 February 1945. The division attacked beyond the Forbach-Saarbruecken Road on 3 March 1945, supported by the 12th Armored Division. The 274th finally captured Stiring Wendel on 5 March 1945 after heavy combat, and divisional patrols reached the outposts of the West Wall on 6 March 1945. The German forces withdrew 13 March 1945. f) American Military Cemetery at St. Avold, France; re-interred 27 December 1945 at Aberdeen, Idaho Cemetery. g) Kari Teeter Randoll, great niece, 450 E. Birnie Slough Road, Cathlamet, Washington 98612. h) Pfc. Cornforth was home on furlough during the 1944 Christmas holidays and was shipped overseas soon after. He’d been in the combat zone about 30 days at the time of his death. He had written his parents that he had been back from the front after three weeks of tough fighting, and had an opportunity to shave and clean up. Also, he had been able to spend a night with his brother, Pfc. LeRoy Cornforth, with the Signal Corps in France, and the boys had enjoyed the visit. Apparently he returned to action after the night spent with LeRoy and made the supreme sacrifice within 24 hours of that time. Another brother, Pfc. Leonard Cornforth was in training at Camp Fannin at the time of Lorraine’s death. Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

COSSOLOTTO, Nino A.

COSSOLOTTO, Nino A., Pvt., 37646212. a) Appanoose County, Iowa. b) Sept-Dec 1944, 58/12. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666, a fellow-trainee at Fannin.

COX, James J., Jr.

COX, James J., Jr., Pvt. a) Ector, Texas b) 1944, A/82, c) 2 May 1944, Camp Fannin. e) One of two 82nd Battalion trainees (the other was Clayton F. Matlock of C/82) crushed by trees blown down by a sudden violent windstorm while the battalion was on bivouac. g) Ruby Neilson, 417 Bond St., Hillsboro, Texas 76645, widow of former CFA president Gordon Neilson. Ruby was a reporter on The Tyler Courier-Times when she and Gordon met, and she found the story about James Cox’s death in the May 2, 1944 edition of The Tyler Courier-Times. See also story in Spring 1997 edition of Camp Fannin Guidon.

CREEGAN, John Thomas

CREEGAN, John Thomas, Pvt., 37749079, DOB Jan. 15, 1922. a) Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri. b) September-December 1944, B/62/13. c) 15 March 1945, near Uttweiler, Germany. d) F/7/3. e) Stanton: The 3rd Infantry Division began its attack toward the Maginot Line on 5 December 1944 and cleared Bennwihr 24 December 1944 after which it was relieved by the 28th Infantry Division. The 3rd Division then renewed its offensive against the Colmar Pocket on 26 January 1945 and crossed the Canal de Colmar on 29 January 1945, then took Horbourg, and the 7th Infantry Regiment reached the outskirts of Colmar. A combat narrative of the action by a German unit, the 17.SS-Panzergrenadier-Division “Gotz von Berlichgen” reports it thus: “15 March 1945: Elements of the Division counterattack a battalion of the 7th Infantry Regiment, U. S. 3rd Infantry Division at Uttweiler, supported by 9 assault guns, 7 of which are destroyed by a relief battalion of the 7th Infantry Regiment along with 4 Wirbelwind Flakwagons.” f) American Military Cemetery, St. Avold, France, Plot D, Row 18, Grave 501; Fort Leavenworth National Cemetery, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. g) Fannin Vet Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666; Individual Deceased Personnel File, Freedom of Information Office, U.S. Army Human Resources Command. h) John T. Creegan’s company commander, Capt. Earl Swanson (not a Fannin vet), was also killed at Uttweiler on 15 March 1945. Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

CURRY, LARRY WAYNE

CURRY, LARRY WAYNE, S/Sgt., 38531232, DOB Nov. 11, 1924. a) Gatesville, Texas b) Aug.-Dec. 1943, C/59/12. c) 30 July 1944, Moyen, France. d) L/116/29. e) Stanton: “On D-Day, 6 June 1944, the 116th Infantry Regiment, attached temporarily to the 1st Infantry Division, stormed Omaha Beach, France and suffered heavy losses under adverse surf conditions and concentrated fire from the high bluffs. The 116th relieved the 2nd Ranger Battalion at Pointe du Hoe on 8 June 1944. The division opened the push on St. Lo 16 June 1944 …On 12 July the 116th was halted on Martinville Ridge after penetrating German lines in front of St. Lo. Parts of the 116th were isolated astride the Bayeaux-St. Lo Road 15-17 July and the division took St. Lo 18 July and were relieved by the 35th Infantry Division. On 29 July the 29th Division attacked east of Percy and captured Vire 7 August.” f) Restland Cemetery, Gatesville, Texas. g) Pawnee Curry Brooks, sister, HC 3, Box 17B, Lampasas, Texas 76550-9402. h) WD telegram to wife Mrs. Ruth A. Curry earlier reported S/Sgt. Curry as missing in action. He was a staff sergeant when he was killed, just 8 months after he finished basic as a private at Fannin. He was 19 years old. Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

DAHLSTEDT, Wayne Wilmer

DAHLSTEDT, Wayne Wilmer, 1st Lt,, O-1328237 (36476622). a) York, Nebraska b) 1943-44, C/64/13, platoon sergeant. c) 31 March or 1 April 1945, Aschaffenburg, Germany. d) I/157/45. e) As platoon leader, leading combat troops that night. Stanton: The 45th Infantry Division attacked across the Rhine River near Hamm 26 March 1945. With three regiments abreast the division sped to the Main and established a bridgehead at Obernau 28 March. The division fought the Battle for Aschaffenburg 28 March-3 April which fell to the 157th Regiment after house-to-house fighting. f) Stromsburg Cemetery, Stromsburg, Nebraska. g) Waldo A. Dahlstedt, brother, 1527 O’Connell, Arkadelphia, Ark. 71923-5847, also a 1st Lt. and in ETO at same time; brothers visited in France; he learned of brother’s death 4 April 1945 from 45th Division graves registration unit. Information also provided by CFA Member Edgar Henley, now deceased, and R. M. Crandell, both fellow cadre members at Fannin. h) Silver Star(above), Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

DAVIS, Charles R.

DAVIS, Charles R., PFC. f) American Military Cemetery, Henri-Chapelle Belgium_ g) Terry Hirsch, Indianapolis, Indiana. Posted 3 February 2016. Additional infonnation to come.

DeBARR, French

DeBARR, French, DOB July 6, 1909. a) Upshur County, West Virginia. b) April 9, 1944 -August 9, 1944, D/65/14. c) Listed as Missing In Action as of November 14, 1944 in Heurtgen Forest. Remains were found near Vossenack, Germany in April 1947, cause of death assumed to be small arms fire or artillery fire. d) B/110/28. e) Stanton: On October 25, 1944, the 28th Infantry Division relieved the 9th Infantry Division and attacked toward Schmidt November 2, 1944 after heavy artillery preparation. The division pushed into the Huertgen Forest and over the next few days heavy fighting caused Vossenack and Schmidt to change hands several times. The division had to pull out the 112th Infantry on November 14 and withdrew the 110th on November 17. f) Remains were returned to the United States in May 1949 and buried at Indian Camp Cemetery, Upshur County, West Virginia. g) Nephew, Michael Phillips, Buckhannon, West Virginia, <wvcivilwar1863@yahoo.com>. h) Thirty-five years old at time of death. Left wife Juanita Phillips DeBarr and daughter Sharon. Bronze Star Medal (left), Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

DEETER, William H.

DEETER, William H., PFC, 15359051. a) Lakewood, Ohio. b) June-November 1943. c) November 2, 1944, near Standdaarbuiten, on the Mark River, The Netherlands. d) 415th Infantry Regiment, 104th Infantry Division. e) Shot by sniper, having been overseas less than a month. Stanton: The 415th Infantzy reached the Mark River 30 October 1944, failed in its first crossing attempt the next day, and then assault,ed across after heavy artillery preparation on 2 November and established a bridgehead in the Standdaarbuiren area. t) Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery, Henri-Chapelle, Belgium, Plot E, Row 9, Grave 47. g) Russell I. Haley, 653 Medford Leas, Medford, New Jersey 08055-2260, Classmate at Lakewood, Ohio High School in 1942, trained together at Camp Fannin in 1943. Camp Fannin Vet Roger Secrest, 4518 Irvin Simmons Drive, Dallas, Texas 75229-4249, also has knowledge of William Deeter’s death. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge. Photo from 1942 Lakewood High School Yearbook.

DEHART, Murray

DEHART, Murray., PFC, 38489796 a) Harris County, Texas b) 1944, B/63/13. c) 16 Dec 1944, Leyte, P.I. g) J. D. Henley, 12321 Swanson, Marana, Arizona 85653, in same company at Fannin; received letters from mother and brother of deceased about his death, visited brother’s home in Abbeville, Louisiana in 1987 and brother gave J.D. a picture of Murray. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

DE LAMA, Ricardo (aka Ricardo D. Martin)

DE LAMA, Ricardo (aka Ricardo D. Martin), Pvt, 32996907, birth date September 26, 1913. a) New York, New York. b) Summer-Fall 1943. c) 23 November 1944, near Livergnano, Italy. d) G/2/133/34. e) “November 23, 1944-ThanksgivingDay-was relatively quiet. During daylight hours, the customary artillery duels took place. Late in the afternoon, the early sunset preceded the usual reconnaissance activity, with patrols on both sides probing the enemy lines. At 6:20 p.m., while on the line at the Company G positions, Pvt Ricardo de Lama was hit by small arms fire and died, struck by a bullet out of the dark.” – from http://www.goticatoscana.eu/EN/>. Search “de Lama” in the database. [Do visit this lovely tribute to her father by his only child. Also Google Ricardo de Lama.] f) Military cemetery at Pietramala near the Raticosa Pass, Italy; repatriated and buried at Pinelawn National Cemetery, Farmingdale, New York. g) Gloria de Lama Sciole, daughter, and Corso P. Boccia of Florence, Italy, a historian researching World War II in Italy, who provided the website citation above. h) Born in Cuba, parents emigrated from Spain at rum of the century. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge. Had been wounded twice before his mortal wound. Updated 11 December 2014.

DeLONG, Paul M.

DeLONG, Paul M., Cpl., 37726226. a) El Dorado, Kansas. b) 1 Dec. 1943 -19 April 1944. c) 15 March 1945, Germany. d) 52ndAIB/9thArmd Div. e) Battle of Remagen Bridge. f) Sunset Lawns Cemetery, El Dorado, Kansas. g) Sister, Elizabeth A. DeLong McKenna, P.O. Box 578, Sharon Springs, Kansas 67758. h) Deceased won American Legion Medal of Honor on completion of 8th grade; treasurer of Hi-Y in his senior year in high school; active in Boy Scouts, member of El Dorado Methodist Church; 19 at time of death. Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

DEVER, William J.

DEVER, William J., Pvt., 31435248. a) Suffolk County, Massachusetts. b) Sept-Dec 1944, 58/12. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666, a fellow-trainee at Fannin.

DEXTER, Loren Ray

DEXTER, Loren Ray, Pvt., 36402402 a) Muskegon County, Michigan b) Stationed in Tyler Nov. 1942, location and duty not known, though Gordon Neilson’s book states “An Army Signal Corps Training Center opened in 1942 in the Tyler Commercial College building in downtown Tyler. Over 200 men were housed in the Blackstone Hotel [and other locations]”. c) 27 Nov. 1944, Leyte, P.I. g) Mrs. Kim Groff, 6414 Shoreline Drive, Little Elm, Texas 75068, phone (972) 294-8160, e-mail <kgroff@sbcglobal,net>. Mrs. Groff is author of The Fitzgerald House, which memorializes the home at 815 South Broadway Avenue in Tyler where Mrs. Lois Whiteman welcomed so many Fannin service men during the war. Mrs. Groff discovered letters to Mrs. Whiteman from many whom she had befriended including Loren Ray Dexter as she researched for her book. On 15 Nov. 1944 Ray wrote from Philippine Islands “A few exciting things have happened but there has been nothing dangerous at all. I haven’t even any firearms.” Then his mother wrote Mrs. Whiteman on 29 Dec. 1944: “ I can hardly write to you, but feel I must, through tears and a broken heart. My own precious boy has paid the supreme sacrifice. I know he would expect me to let you know.” h) Purple Heart.

DILLON, Robert Charles

DILLON, Robert Charles, Sgt., 39333705. a) Portland, Oregon. b) Summer 1944. c) 16 March 1945, near Remagen, Germany. d) B/393/99. e) Quoting brother’s letter: “He and his troops were pinned down by well-camouflaged enemy fire. Someone had to stand up and draw fire so they could locate the machine guns. He did–led the charge that eventually succeeded in destroying enemy position.” f) Originally in Belgium, later returned to his home in Portland, Oregon and buried in family plot, Mt. Calvary Cemetery. g) His older and only brother, James F. Dillon, 10938 Hansom Lane, Spring Valley, Calif. 91978, (619) 660-6614. Also Pat Fordney, 2770 S. Via Del Bac, Green Valley, Arizona 85614, who wrote in a letter printed in the Fall 1998 issue of Camp Fannin Guidon: “Robert Dillon was a boyhood friend of mine. I was standing right next to him when he was killed.” Brother James visited Robert and Pat at Fannin in the summer of 1944. Pat is listed as a pallbearer at Robert’s reinterment in 1947. h) Robert received the Silver Star (top left) for gallantry in action, the Bronze Star (bottom left), and the Belgian Fourragere. Robert’s high school English teacher wrote a poem in tribute ending with these lines: “They charged the hill through cannon fire, their trusted sergeant on ahead. They took that height with broken hearts: their valiant sergeant dead. In holy ground in Belgium ‘neath the arch of a lovely sky, Sergeant Robert Dillon rests. He can never die.”

DISTELHORST, W.A., Jr. (Bill.)

DISTELHORST, W.A., Jr. (Bill.) PFC, 37677123 a) Des Moines County, Iowa b) Winter 1943-44, A/54/11. c) 1944, Pacific Theater. g) Willis N. DeSpain, DeSpain Investment Co., 627 Main St., Mediapolis, Iowa 52637; (319) 394-3969, in the same company at Fannin.

DOCER, Blayne.

DOCER, Blayne. c) 1945. g) George Cason, Jr., 1705 Shelmire Drive, Dallas, Texas 75224-1339; (214) 942-7235.

DOYLE, Edward E. (“Buddy”)

DOYLE, Edward E. (“Buddy”), Sgt., 15315541 a) Morristown, New Jersey. c) Dec. 1944, Southern France. d) 179/45. e) Hospitalized in October for an infected arm, but soon rejoined his outfit. Wounded in action on Nov. 28 and died of his wounds in December. g) Joe Quade, 4 Cain Court, Montville, N.J. 07045; (201) 263-2433; fax (201) 263-2433. Joe trained at Fannin July-Sept. 1943, wound up in the 17th Airborne Div. after ASTP at MIT, and now is editor of the division’s official publication, Thunder from Heaven. h) Buddy Doyle wrote this to his friend John “Red” Cumisky on Sept. 16, 1944: “Right now I am in a deep hole and sweating out 88s…Believe me, Red, I’m not the fearless kid you knew back in Dublin (a section of Morristown). All that was taken out of me a while back. So far, so good, however, as I haven’t been touched. Close doesn’t count. Pray for me, please.” Buddy’s company commander wrote this to his parents: “Due to some particularly heavy fighting, I got to know some of my men very well. Among those men I got to know and admire as fighting men was your son, Sgt. Doyle.” Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

DRAKE, Aubrey E., Jr.

DRAKE, Aubrey E., Jr., Pvt., 38617930 a) Minden, Louisiana. b) 1944. c) 13 April 1945, Annarode, Germany. d) 32nd Armored Regiment, 3rd Armored Division. e) Stanton: The 3rd Armored Division reached the Rhine River at Roggendorf and Worringen 4 March 1945 and fought the Battle for Cologne 5-7 March 1945 assisted by the 104th Infantry Division. After maintaining defensive positions, it crossed the Rhine 23 March 1945 and attacked again 25 March 1945. It reached the Lahn River at Marburg 28 March 1945 then closed the Ruhr Pocket after the Battle of Paderborn 31 March-1 April. The division reached the Weser River on 7 April 1945 and the Mulde River near Torten 15 April 1945. f) First buried in Belgium, then reinterred in Minden City Cemetery, Section H, Minden, Louisiana. g) See <http://www.mindenmemories.org/Before 1945.htm>. h) Purple Heart.

DRENKHAHN, Edward A.

DRENKHAHN, Edward A., Pvt., 42187111 a) Bergen County, New Jersey. b) Sept-Dec 1944, 58/12. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666, a fellow-trainee at Fannin.

DUKES, H.V.

DUKES, H.V. No further information.

DUTER, William H.

DUTER, William H. Awaiting further information.

ECKARD, Franklin G., Sr.

ECKARD, Franklin G., Sr., Pfc, 34963591. a) Connelly Springs, North Carolina. b) A/84/15, Spring 1944. c) 28 November 1944, Farbersville, France. d) A/317/80. e) Killed by small arms fire as unit was withdrawing from Farbersville. Stanton: “The division attacked across the Seille River 8 November 1944 with three regiments abreast. It advanced despite mud, mines, and highway congestion to seize a bridge at Faulquemont over the Neide Allemande River on 20 November 1944. It took St. Avold 27 November 1944 then fought the battle of Farbersville.” f) Temporary burial in a military cemetery in Europe; remains returned to U. S. in 1947 and buried at Mt. Harmony Methodist Church Cemetery, Icard, North Carolina 28666. g) Franklin Eckard, Jr., son, P.O. Box 657, Hildebran, North Carolina 28637. h) Killed in just his eighth month in the Army; he was 34 years old and left four small children, the eldest 9 years old. His widow was still living at age 93 in 2003. Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

FAHNESTOCK, Floyd A.

FAHNESTOCK, Floyd A., Pvt.., 33512488 a) Dauphin County, Pennsylvania c) 5 July 44, Normandy. d) B/115/29. g) George Cason, Jr., 1705 Shelmire Drive, Dallas, Texas 75224-1339; information provided by John Hooper, 8 Fox Hollow Road, Joshua, Texas 76058-4869. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

FAHRENKRUG, Frank H.

FAHRENKRUG, Frank H., Pvt., 37646240. a) Iowa. c) 16 May 1945, Okinawa. d) K/307/77. e) Stanton: The 306th and 307th Regiments fought the Battle of Chocolate Drop Hill 11-20 May 45. f) Officially listed as missing in action, Frank H. Fahrenkrug’s name is inscribed on Tablets of the Missing at Honolulu Memorial, Hawaii. g) Fannin Vet Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666. Additional information provided by son of Frank H. Fahrenkrug. h) Bronze Star Medal (right), Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

FARRIS, Fred C.

FARRIS, Fred C., Pvt., 37738969. a) Buchanan County, Missouri. b) April 1944. c) 22 October 1944, Germany. d) 120/30. e) Stanton: The 30th Infantry Division attacked across the Wurm River between Aachen and Geilenkirchen 2 October 1944 against strong German opposition, and the following day the 117th Inf. seized Uebach after house-to-house fighting as the 119th finally captured Rimburg Castle. The division was assisted by the 2nd Armored Division as it continued slow progress in the West Wall, but was checked by a German counterattack on 9 October 1944 which isolated the 119th Inf. at North Wuerselen. The encirclement of Aachen was completed regardless on 16 October 1944 when the division made contact with the 1st Infantry Division. f) Netherlands American Cemetery, Margraten, Netherlands, Plot A, Row 5, Grave 9. g) Phillip Farris, son, 7806 N. Stoddard Ave., Kansas City, Missouri 64152-2165; phillipfarris@sbcglobal.net . h) Fred Farris’ wife Mrs. Louise Marie Farris, received a letter, date not known, from Miss Mia Geilen of Schaesberg, Holland, saying, “I adopted your husband’s grave in March 1945. It is a great honor for us that we are able to look after the grave of your dear husband who gave his life to free us…He gave his life for us Holland people who lived under the hated oppressors for years…” Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

FEIGENBAUM, Irving A.

FEIGENBAUM, Irving A., PFC, 42187270. a) Essex County, New Jersey. b) Sept-Dec 1944, 58/12. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666, a fellow-trainee at Fannin.

FISHER, Kermit Camden

FISHER, Kermit Camden, PFC, 35757903, DOB November 22, 1922. a) Glenville, West Virginia. c) September 17, 1944, northern Italy north of the. Arno River. d) C/338/85. e) During the night of September 16, 1944 in the course of an attack on the German Gothic Line, Kermit was a platoon runner maintaining contact between his platoon’s thre.e squads receiving intense enemy fire during an attack on a major objective. After the enemy was forced from their position, Kermit joined in another assault against a double bunker position and using rifle. fire and grenades forc.ed his way to the bunker itself and was killed by machine gun fire. f) Originally buried at Castlefiorentino, Italy, then buried in the Stalnaker Cemetery in Glenville, West Virginia on March 3, 1949. g) Rodney Young, Kermit’s nephew. h) Bronze Star (right), Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge. Posted I I November

FLESH, Alfred L., Jr.

FLESH, Alfred L., Jr., T5, 35872240 . a) Columbus, Ohio. b) July-Nov 43, B/63/13; c) Leyte, Philippine Islands, 8 Jan 45; d) A/718 Amph Tractor Bn, attached to 77th Inf. Div. e} Made the initial assault landing on Leyte, killed by enemy mortar fire during a follow-up landing; f) Permanent burial at the American Military Cemetery in Fort Bonifacio, Manila, Philippine Islands, Plot B, Row 7, Grave 14. g) William J. Reilly, 93 Park Ave., Unit 1504, Danbury, Connecticut 06810, friend from Camp Fannin who served in the same outfit overseas. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

FOLDEN, Lawrence F.

FOLDEN, Lawrence F., Pvt., 37582120, 12/24/23. a) Holt, Minnesota b) 1943-44. c) September 7, 1944, vicinity Coat-Ly-Ogan, Crozon Peninsula, Brittany, France. d) 28th Regiment/8th Infantry Division. e) Stanton: On 25 August 1944, the 8th Infantry Division initiated the attack on the outer defenses of Brest after a preparatory bombardment, battled up Hill 80, and made an all-out assault on the fortress-city 8 September 1944. f) Folden Mission Cemetery, northwest of Holt, Minnesota. g) Shane Olson, Adjutant, 9th District Sons of American Legion, 216 Railroad Avenue South, Halma, Minnesota 56729-2908, who learned of his death while researching for soldiers from his area killed during the war. Shane Olson also provided information for Robert E. Harms, another Fannin vet from his area of Minnesota, also killed in Brittany in September 1944 while fighting with the 29th Infantry Division. “Lawrence Folden and Robert Harms were in the same vicinity of Coat-Ly-Ogan when they were killed just three days apart,” Shane reports. h) Entered service in December 1943 and arrived in England June 1944. Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

FOLTZ, Walter L.

FOLTZ, Walter L., Pvt., 39709003 a) San Bernardino, California b) 1944. c) 22 June 1944, Cherbourg, France. d) H/2/12/4. e) Stanton: The 4th Infantry Division arrived in England 26 January 1944 and assaulted Normandy, France 6 June 1944. g) Nephew, Lester O. Foltz, Jr., Redmond, Washington. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

FORTENBERRY, Kohlin D.

FORTENBERRY, Kohlin D., S/Sgt. a) Garvey, California. b) D/52/11 (basic trainee). c) Aug 1, 1944, France. g) Howard H. Hoblet, 6628 Tully-Harrison Road, Convoy, Ohio 45832, company clerk D/52/11 both at Camp Robinson, Arkansas and Camp Fannin. Learned of deceased’s death from Letter 4, dated Jan. 1, 1945, sent out to former members of D/52/11 by John B. Culbertson, then stationed in Ft. Meade, Md. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

FULLER, D. C.

FULLER, D. C., S/Sgt., 38516177. a) Rosston, Arkansas. c) Nov. 24, 1944, Germany. d) A/175/29. e) Stanton: The 29th Infantry Division began the offensive for the Roer 16 November 1944 with the 115th and 175th Inf. leading. Setterich was taken by the 116th after heavy combat 19 Nov. 44, enabling the the 2nd Armored Div. to push through. The 175th Inf. took and lost Bourheim and then recaptured it and held it in the face of strong German counterattacks 23 Nov. 44. f) Mt. Moriah Cemetery, 12 miles south of Prescott, Arkansas on U.S. 371. g) Sister, Mrs. Wanda Fuller Steed, 608 Brookhaven Court, Jacksonville, Arkansas 72076-3703. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

GALLEY, Harold B.

GALLEY, Harold B., Pvt., 37738946, DOB March 17, 1912. a) Omaha, Nebraska. b) Spring 1944, B/63/13. c) November 17, 1944, Germany. d) Company C, 16th Inf. Regt., 1st Infantry Division. e) Stanton: The 1st Inf. Div. laid siege to the fortress city of Aachen on Sept. 12, 1944 and the city was finally taken on Oct. 21. The division then opened the First Army’s offensive to secure the Roer River Crossings east of Aachen on Nov. 16. This was the beginning of the controversial Huertgen Forest Battle which lasted almost five months and killed or incapacitated 33,000 First Army men. f) Henri Chappelle #1, Belgium, Plot X, Row 1, Grave 20; Columbus Cemetery, Columbus, Nebraska. g) Daughter, Carolyn A. Givan, 6920 Poudre Road #10, Greeley, Colorado 80634, (979) 353-7967, <carolyngivan@comcast.net> . She writes: “My father wrote quite a nice letter to me when I was a little girl that tells in detail how they traveled. He also tells me why he is fighting and for whom. It is a patriotic letter written from one of the cattle cars in which the men were transported. This letter was printed in The Omaha World Herald on Thanksgiving Day, 2008.” h) Harold Galley was 32 years old and married with children at the time he was drafted and had been in the Army less than eight months when he was killed. Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

GANTZ, Leroy A.

GANTZ, Leroy A., Pvt., 33877458. a) Pennsylvania. c) 18 Feb. 1945, France. d) G/274/70. e) Quoting the Division combat narrative published in Shelby L. Stanton’s World War II Order of Battle: “The 274th and 275th Regiments cleared the heights commanding both Saarbruecken and Stiring Wendel by 24 Feb. 45.” f) Epinal American Cemetery, France, Plot A, Row 22, Grave 22. g) Fannin Vet Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666. h) Purple Heart,Combat Infantry Badge.

GARNER, J. T., Jr.

GARNER, J. T., Jr., PFC, 36759718. a) Rockford, Illinois. b) Aug.-Nov. 1943, D/63/13. c) 30 Dec. 44, Belgium. d) 394/99. e) Stanton: On 16 Dec. 44 the German Ardennes Counteroffensive hit the 99th division which was partially surrounded and suffered heavy losses…From 21 Dec.-29 Jan. the division was rebuilt on the front and maintained defensive positions. f) Rockford, Ill. g) Philip McDonald, 1550 W. Appleby Rd., Palatine, Ill. 60067-4431, in same company with J. T. at Fannin and in same high school class in 1943 at West Rockford High, Rockford, Ill. Philip had a letter from Bernard Pellet, who was in the same company at Fannin and in the 99th with J.T. Also, Phil’s mother sent him a newspaper clipping. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

GILL, James E.

GILL, James E. Pvt., 38633091, DOB I May 1921. a) Limestone County, Texas. c) 18 February 1945. t) Hamilton Beeman Cemetery, Retreat, Texas. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666. h) Updated 11 July 201 I thanks to Shane Olson, Hallock, Minnesota.

GINTHNER, Charles V.

GINTHNER, Charles V., Pvt., 37798034 a) Hennepin County, Minnesota b) June 1945, C/81. c) June 1945, Camp Fannin. d) C/81. e) Quoting Malcolm E. Myers (see g) below): “I arrived at Camp Fannin on about the second week of June 1945 to begin basic training as an I&R man. On one day early in that week, we were taken out to a drill field just across the street from our C/81 battalion office. We ran several laps around the field and did several exercises before being marched back to our company area where we began a class in rolling our field packs. About 10 minutes into our class, I looked to my left and saw one of the men in the class as he laid back on the ground very obviously in distress, and the non-com conducting the class ran to the office and called for an ambulance which arrived in a very few minutes and the man was taken to the base hospital. Later that day First Sgt. Pratt told us sadly that we had lost a man in our company. He was Pvt. Charles V Ginthner, a former policeman from St. Louis, Mo. He was married and over 30 but I do not remember whether he had children. Sgt. Pratt accompanied Pvt. Ginthner’s body back to St. Louis. He stated that Pvt. Ginthner was a very highly regarded man on the St. Louis police force. He further stated that he saw many of Pvt. Ginthner’s fellow officers shedding tears unashamedly at the funeral.” f) Ft. Snelling, Minn. g) Malcolm E. Myers, 2111 Dennis Drive, Hammond, Louisiana 70401, who was in the same company at Fannin and witnessed the deceased’s death.

GOODSELL, Lorren F.

GOODSELL, Lorren F., S/Sgt., 36198078 a) Hudson, Michigan. b) D/52/11 platoon sergeant. c) 27 Nov. 44, France. d) 7th Army. g) Howard H. Hoblet, 6628 Tully-Harrison Road, Convoy, Ohio 45832, company clerk D/52/11 both at Camp Robinson, Arkansas and Camp Fannin. Learned of deceased’s death from Letter 4, dated Jan. 1, 1945, sent out to former members of D/52/11 by John B. Culbertson, then stationed in Ft. Meade, Md.

GOULD, William James

GOULD, William James, Pvt., 19132007, DOB 14 July 1924. a) Los Angeles, California b) January-May 1944, 4th Platoon, A/56/12 c) 8 August 1944 Saint Malo, Brittany, France. d) Medical Detachment, A/330/83. e) Stanton: The 83rd Infantry Division landed across Omaha Beach on 19 June 1944, took over defensive positions, and attacked against strong opposition toward Pericrs 4 July 1944. Sl Eny fell 9 July and the division regrouped along the Ays River 15 July. The division renewed its attack 26 July as part of the Operation Cobra Breakout and in heavy combat crossed the Taute River the next day. Aller consolidation the division followed the 6th Annored Division and reached the fortified city of Saint Malo 4 August. It began the Battle of Saint Malo the same day and forced back German defenders to the strongpoints of The Citadel and Dinard 9 August afler combined assaults. William James Gould’s body was one of five Americans found in a burned-out pillbox. f) First buried at temporary American Military Cemetery at St James-A vranches, then reburied at the permanent Brittany American Cemetery nearby, Plot L, Row 11, Grave 15. g) M. Remy Mortelette, 83rd Infantry Division Association, <83rd.thunderboltdivision@gmail.com>. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

GRAY, Robert M.

GRAY, Robert M., PFC, 42001987. a) Nutley, New Jersey. b) 1943. c) 19 April 1945, Stalag 1X-B, Bad Orb, Germany. d) 275/70. e) On 8 January 1945, Robert M. Gray was captured in action near Phillipsbourg, France and sent to the POW camp at Bad Orb. Soon after his capture he was sent out with a labor battalion and was never heard from again. Stanton: The three regiments of the 70th Infantry Division arrived at Marseille, France 10-15 December 1944 in advance of the rest of the division, and were formed into Task Force Herren which assumed defensive positions along the west bank of the Rhine near Bischweiler on 28 December 1944. As the German offensive advanced in the Bitche Salient, Task Force Herren was sent to assist the 45th Infantry Division. The 276th Regiment of the 70th took up switch-positions in the Wingen-Wimmenau-Rosteig area on 3 January 1945, and on 8 January 1945, Task Force Herren was given the task of protecting the east flank of the 45th Infantry Division during the drive against the salient. f) Lorraine American Cemetery at St. Avold, France, Plot K, Row 43, Grave 12. g) See <http://www.anthonysworld.com/w2_gray.html>. h) Following basic at Fannin, Robert M. Gray transferred to the Air Corps, going to Sheppard Field, Texas, and then on to Eastern Oregon College at LeGrande, Oregon. There he became captain of the Cadet Corps. In the Spring of 1944, he was one of a large group of Air Corps men who were transferred to the infantry and was sent to the 70th Infantry Division at Ft. Leonard Wood, Missouri. Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

GRAY, William George

GRAY, William George, Pvt, 39923276. a) Lovelock, Nevada. b) July-August 1944, D/57/12. c) 14 September 1944, Sevenig-Roscbeidt-Hanspelt area, Gennany. d) E/109/28. e) Stanton: The 28th Division paraded through Paris 29 August 1944 on its way to assigned attack positions northeast of the French capital. The division crossed the Oise River at Pont Ste. Maxence in the Chantilly-Compiegne area 31 August 1944. It continued across France and passed through Belgium east of Sedan, and crossed into Gennany from Luxembourg near Binsfield 11 September 1944, capturing the Our River bridge intact The 110th Regiment began hammering the West Wall west ofGrosskampenberg 12 September 1944, and both the 109th and 110th breached it after overcoming heavy opposition two days later. t) Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery, Henri-Chapelle, Belgium, Plot F, Row 16, Grave 18. g) Daughter, Gloria A. Haslam, 605 Tougas Lane, Ronan, Montana 59864. “In loving memory – lest we forget,” writes Mrs. Haslam. She also writes that her father arrived in France 27 August 1944, marched in victory parade through Paris, limited advance across Gennan border, KIA just over the Siegfried Line. Had been in Europe two weeks.” He left a wife, daughter, and son, all of whom survive as of October 2004. h) Bronze Star Medal, Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

GREENE, Rex E., Jr.

GREENE, Rex E., Jr., PFC, 11096153. a) Connecticut. b) June-Oct. 1943. c) 1 Dec. 44, Germany. d) 335/84. e) Stanton: On 29 Nov 44, the 84th Division began the drive on the Roer River as the 335th Infantry reached Lindern and repulsed counterattacks, and took Beeck the following day. f) Netherlands American Cemetery, Margraten, Netherlands, Plot D, Row 19, Grave 6. g) William McIlvain, 501 Riverdale Ave., Yonkers, N.Y. 10705, who heard of death from deceased’s parents. Also, Fannin Vet Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

GREISE, Carl A.

GREISE, Carl A., 35681335. d) 26th Infantry Regiment, !st Infantry Division. g) Terry Hirsch, Indianapolis, Indiana. Posted 3 February 2016. Additional infonnation to come.

GRIZELL, Edward F.

GRIZELL, Edward F., PFC, 37747680 a) Macksville, Kansas. b) July-Oct. 1944. c) 29 March 1945, near Dorsten, Germany. d) 75th Inf. Div. e) Killed by artillery fire in the battle of the Ruhr. Stanton: The 290th Infantry Regiment of the 75th Division crossed the Rhine 24 March 1945, followed by the rest of the division on 30 March 1945. Since Dorsten, where Edward F. Grizell was killed is east of the Rhine, and only the 290th had crossed the Rhine on the date of his death, he must have been a member of 290/75. g) E. Olen Mitchell, 2405 Colorado Street, Hutchinson, Kansas 67502, who found Edward F. Grizzell’s name in his hometown roster of WWII KIAs. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

HADDOCK, William Arthur

HADDOCK, William Arthur, Pvt., 38347899. a) Slayton, Texas. b) Fall 1943-Spring 1944, B/63/13. c) 14 Sept. 1944, Italy. d) 338/85. e) Stanton: The 338th Infantry fought the battle for Mt. Altuzzo 14-17 Sept. 44. f) Florence American Cemetery, Florence, Italy, Plot D, Row 12, Grave 28. g) J. D. Henley, 12321 Swanson, Marana, Arizona 85653. In same company at Fannin, visited deceased’s brother Edwin H. Haddock in Lubbock, Texas in 1992. Additional information provided by Fannin Vet Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

HAMBLIN, Lacy M.

HAMBLIN, Lacy M., PFC, 34876878. a) Sledge, Mississippi. b) December 1943 – April 1944, C/81/15. c) 10
December 1944, Folpersweiler, France. d) C/134/35. e) Killed in German counterattack. Stanwn: The 134th Infanuy Regiment wok Hilsprich with tanks and massive artillery fire on 24 November 1944. The division pushed inw Sarreguemines 6 December 1944 and the 134th and 32dh Regiments assaulted across the Saar River the next day and defended their bridgehead against strong German attacks. Saareguemines was reduced after house-w-house combat 11 December 1944. t) U. S. Military Cemetery, Limey, France; permanent burial Crenshaw, Mississippi. g) Nephew, Randolph Fair, 1712 Pinewood Drive, Huntsville, Alabama 35806. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

HANEY, Robert L.

HANEY, Robert L., Jr., Pvt. a) Muskegon Heights, Michigan. b) D/61/13. c) 3 May 1945, Okinawa. f) Mona View Cemetery, Muskegon Heights, Mich. g) Thomas C. Vermilya, Jr., 3808 Ponta Luna Road, Fruitport, Mich. “We were classmates in school, both trained at Fannin and Ft. Ord, went overseas together and landed on Okinawa as replacements and placed in different units.” Learned of Robert’s death by letter from home, later saw listing of Muskegon County War Dead in Nov. 12, 1945 issue of Muskegon Chronicle.

HANF, Roy Edward

HANF, Roy Edward, PFC, 37628607. a) Cape Girardeau, Missouri. b) 1943- 44. c) 12 Oct. 1944, Foret de Parroy, near Luneville, France. d) G/315/79. e) On a mission with his unit to secure the enemy from a wooded area. Killed by shell fragments from enemy mortar and small arms fire. f) Epinal American Cemetery, Epinal, France, Plot B, Row 18, Grave 37. g) Jim Dollar, Lt. Col. (Ret). “Roy Hanf was a member of the 3rd Platoon, Co. G, 315th Inf., 79th Div. I was his platoon leader as a 1st Lt.” Additional information provided by Fannin Vet Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666. h) Roy Hanf was 37 years old when he was killed. He had worked more than 20 years for International Shoe Company in Cape Girardeau at the time of his induction. He was a member of Trinity Lutheran Church and the Walther League.

HANNA, James R., Jr.

HANNA, James R., Jr., PFC, 38590781 a) Ottawa County, Oklahoma b) Fall 1943-Spring 1944, B/63/13. c) 1945, Mindanao, P.I. d) 34/24 (?). g) J. D. Henley, 12321 Swanson, Marana, Arizona 85653. In same company at Fannin. Heard about James’ death from another member of his Fannin company, Irving Herndon. “I know for certain that Irving Herndon was in the 34th Regiment of the 24th Division in Mindanao in 1945, and he told me that Hanna was KIA in Mindanao in 1945.”

HARMS, Robert E.

HARMS, Robert E., Pvt., 37581684, April 24, 1924. a) Pencer, Minnesota b) 1943-44. c) September 10, 1944, vicinity Coat-Ly-Ogan, Crozon Peninsula, Brittany, France. d) 175th Regiment/29th Infantry Division. e) Stanton: On 29 July 1944, the 29th Infantry Divisionattacked east of Percy and captured contested Vire 7 August 1944. The division was moved west by motor into Brittany to positions outside the fortress of Brest, which it began attacking 25 August 1944. The 116th and 175th Infantry Regiments assaulted the Le Conquet Peninsula containing the formidable Batterie Graf Spee, and on 29 August 1944 the division seized the crest of key Hill 103 but the battle for this commanding feature took several more days. The all-out assault on the city was made 8 September 1944 and German resistance collapsed there on 18 September 1944. f) Hope Cemetery, Roseau, Minnesota. g) Shane Olson, Adjutant, 9th District Sons of American Legion, 216 Railroad Avenue South, Halma, Minnesota 56729-2908, who learned of his death while researching for soldiers from his area killed during the war. Shane Olson also provided information for Lawrence F. Folden, another Fannin vet from his area of Minnesota, also killed in Brittany in September 1944 while fighting with the 8th Infantry Division. “Lawrence Folden and Robert Harms were in the same vicinity of Coat-Ly-Ogan when they were killed just three days apart,” Shane reports. h) Entered service in early 1943 and went overseas May 1944. Previously wounded and sent to England, then returned to his unit.

HAWN, Herman Allen

HAWN, Herman Allen, PFC, 37694854. a) Conway, Iowa. b) 18 April 44 – 8 Sept. 44, B/83/15. c) 29 April 45, Luhoff, Germany. d) B/65AIB/20 Armd. e) Stanton: “The Division attacked through the 42nd and 45th Inf Div lines to open the drive on Munich 28 April 1945 as it crossed the Danube. It advanced rapidly to Munich where it cleared strong opposition in certain sectors 29-30 Apr. 45”. g) Evelyn Axtell, former CFA president, 11728 Farm Rd. 2767, Tyler, Texas 75708-9244; CFA Member Joyce W. Johnson, RR #1, Box 81, Blanchard, Iowa 51630, and CFA Member Lowell Hawn, Herman’s brother, 603 Oberlin Avenue, College Springs, Iowa 51637. h) Herman was 18 when he died, won the Bronze Star.

HAYES, Walter W

HAYES, Walter W. Please send any information you have about Walter W. Hayes.

HEATON, C. Ralph

HEATON, C. Ralph, Sgt., 35233638. b) Aug. – Fall 1943, C/56/12. c) 17 Oct. 44, somewhere in Austria. d) Army Air Force. e) Tail-gunner on bomber shot down over Austria. f) Buried at crash site in Austria (exact spot unknown). g) Lee McCool, in same company at Fannin, 6172 McKenzie Rd., North Olmsted, Ohio 44070-4903. “In the early Fall of 1943 (and you may well remember it), all trainees had the opportunity for a short time to get into the USAF. Ralph got the necessary birth certificate and letters of recommendation and was on his way. Ironically, Ralph said he wanted out of the Infantry because ‘it was too easy to get killed’. In 2001, I ran an ad in ‘Good Old Days’ Magazine and received a letter from a lady in Marietta, Georgia saying she was a cousin of Ralph’s. She sent me names of a sister and two brothers of Ralph’s, and a letter and phone call got the information.” h) Ralph received Air Medal with 2 stars.

HEBERT, Dennis

HEBERT, Dennis, PFC. a) New Iberia, Louisiana. b) Sept. 43-March 44. c) Philippine Islands, date uncertain, hand grenade. d) A/126/32. e) Stanton: 126th rejoined 32nd Div. at sea 9-14 Nov. 44 while in transit to Philippine Islands, and landed at Leyte 14 Nov. 44; landed at Lingayen Gulf Luzon 27 Jan. 45; attached to 25th Inf Div. 23 May-30 June 45. f) Philippines. g) Martin Hickman, 407 Reynolds, Taft, Texas 78390. “He was the best friend I ever had. Best friends from Camp Fannin until his death. We were lying side by side when he was wounded. I went to see him next morning and medic told me he had died at 10 p.m. He tried to be a perfect soldier.” h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

HEINDEL, Harold L.

HEINDEL, Harold L., Pvt., 39932297, date of birth 10 October 1919. a) Idaho Falls, Idaho. b) Summer-Fall 1944. c) 10 May 1945, Okinawa. d) Company C, 382nd Infantry, 96th Infantry Division. e) Harold L. Heindel was killed by a hand grenade as his unit, under heavy enemy fire, assaulted an enemy position on Zebra Hill. f) Rose Hill Cemetery, Idaho Falls, Idaho. g) Shane Olson, Adjutant, 9th District Sons of American Legion, 216 Railroad Avenue South, Halma, Minnesota 56729-2908. Additional information was provided by Don Dencker, 96th Division historian, who was fighting on Okinawa in L Company of the 382nd at tl1e time Harold Heindel was killed. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge. See also http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi qn4 I 88/is 20 030915/ai n I I 4063 77/

HO, William A. O.

HO, William A. O., Pvt., 30111090. a) Hawaii. c) 21 Feb. 45, near Saarbruecken, Germany. d) 275/70. e) Stanton: …on 17 Feb 45 the 276th Regiment made a limited offensive against the heights southwest of Saarbruecken…The 274th and 275th cleared the heights commanding both Saarbruecken and Stiring Wendel by 24 Feb. 45. f) Reinterred in native Hawaii at Honolulu Memorial Cemetery. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666. h) Bronze Star Medal (left), Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

HOCKADAY, James E.

HOCKADAY, James E., 33859536. a) Warwick County, Virginia. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666.

HOERRMANN, Bryan J., Jr.

HOERRMANN, Bryan J., Jr., PFC, 37749311. a) Green Castle, Missouri. b) 1944-45, A/65/13. c) 5 April 45, Germany. g) sister, Mrs. William (Annabelle) Swisher, RR 1, Box 111, Green Castle, Missouri 63544. h) Family received American Legion Gold Star Citation from Dept. of Missouri 30 May 46.

HOLLAND, Norbert J.

HOLLAND, Norbert J. f) American Military Cemetery, Henri-Chapelle, Belgium. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge. Post£d 3 Febroaiy 2016. Additional infonnation to come.

HOLLINGSWORTH, John.M.

HOLLINGSWORTH, John.M., Pvt., 38496675 a) Baton Rouge, Louisiana. b) 31 July-6 Dec. 43. c) 18 June 44, Hill 108, Normandy, France. d) 29th Div. e) John was an ammunition carrier for a light machine gun. Killed by mortar fragment. Stanton: The 29th Division opened the push on St.Lo 16 June 1944. f) Baton Rouge, Louisiana. g) Emory A. Domen, 1990 Minno Drive, Johnstown, Pennsylvania 15905-1172. Emory writes: “Went to basic training together and served in same platoon in 29th Division. I was 6 feet from him when he was killed. I was very closely attached to him.” h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

HOLMAN, Albert W.

HOLMAN, Albert W., Pvt. 37630803. a) Missouri. c) 22 Nov. 1944, near Faulquemont, France. d) A/318/80. e) Stanton: “The [80th] Division attacked across the Seille River 8 Nov 44 with three regiments abreast. It advanced despite mud, mines, and highway congestion to seize a bridge at Faulquemont over the Nied Allemande River on 20 Nov. 44. It took evacuated St. Avold 27 Nov. 44.” f) Lorraine American Cemetery, St. Avold, France, Plot B, Row 12, Grave 38. He was first buried at Limay, France, Plot 5, Row 4, Grave 95. g) George Cason, Jr., 1705 Shelmire Drive, Dallas, Texas 75224-1339. George provided a copy of a newsletter dated 29 Nov. 45 headed Greetings Clerk School Gang, Bulletin #1, disclosing Al Holman’s death. Editor had received a letter from Al Holman’s mother, Mrs. Wendell Holman: “Our hearts are broken. Albert was our only child and every dream and hope in life centered around that boy…I will always have a warm spot in my heart for any of Albert’s friends.” Information revised based on information provided 28 January 2006 by Jeff Wignall of Peabody, Massachusetts, <Member9219@aol.com> and by American Battle Monuments Commission.

HOPKINS, Arlie L.

HOPKINS, Arlie L., Pvt., 38515903. a) Natural Dam, Arkansas. b) 1943, B/55. c) July 30, 1944, near St. Lo, France. d) 116/29. e) Following the liberation of St. Lo, the 29th Division was participating in Operation Cobra, the Normandy breakout. Stanton: On July 29, the 29 Division attacked east of Percy. Another history of the division reports that German resistance was stubborn. Self-propelled 88s and small infantry units harassed the 29th as the Germans fought delaying actions and in late July, the Germans launched a counter-offensive. f) First buried in an unidentified American military cemetery, then reinterred in April 1949 in the Bryant cemetery near his home in Arkansas g). His sister, Florence Hopkins Fields, 688 North 153rd East Avenue, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74116-2821, (918) 437-0437; information transmitted through Kenneth James and Viola Errett of the Camp Fannin Association.

HORTON, Irving F.

HORTON, Irving F., PFC, 31368579 a) Bristol County, Massachusetts b) D/52/11. c) 2 Sept. 44, Southern France. g) Howard H. Hoblet, 6628 Tully-Harrison Road, Convoy, Ohio 45832, company clerk D/52/11 both at Camp Robinson, Arkansas and Camp Fannin. Learned of deceased’s death from Letter 4, dated Jan. 1, 1945, sent out to former members of D/52/11 by John B. Culbertson, then stationed in Ft. Meade, Md.

HUMBIRD, Dunlap, Jr.

Humbird, Dunlap, Jr., c) On the battle field on Biak. g) Great Nephew, Steven Mullins of Dalton, Ohio. h) The family story goes that his mother died of a broken heart over his passing.

JACKSON, Kenneth D.

JACKSON, Kenneth D., Pvt., 37739022. a) Augusta, Kansas. b) March-Sept 1944, B/63/13. c) 20 Nov. 44, Germany. d) 175/29. e) Stanton: The 29th Division began the offensive for the Roer 16 Nov. 44 with the 115th and 175th regiments leading… The 175th took and lost Bourheim and then recaptured it and held it in the face of strong German counterattacks. f) Netherlands American Cemetery, Margraten, Netherlands, Plot E, Row 16, Grave 6. g) John C. Oliver, 140 Residence, El Dorado, Kansas 67042-1544, from information provided by Kenneth Jackson’s wife, Frances E. Jackson, 1301 Dearborn St, Augusta, Kansas 67010-1823: “…Would like very much to hear from you if you have any information. We had two little girls age 2 and 4.” h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantryman Badge.

JAMES, George P.

JAMES, George P., 38347854. b) Fall 43 – Spring 44, B/63/13. f) Ft. Sam Houston, Texas. Added 13 March 2014, courtesy of Shane Olson. g) J. D. Henley, 12321 Swanson, Marana, Arizona 85653. In same company at Fannin. Received information from George James’ wife in 1946.

JAROSZ, Walter A.

JAROSZ, Walter A., PFC, 33925241. a) Pennsylvania. c) 6 April, 1945, Germany. d) 290/75. e) Stanton: The 75th Division attacked across the canal to Waltrop on 4 Apr 45 and began clearing the approaches to Dortmund. The division was reinforced by the 320th Regiment and crossed the Ruhr at Witten with four regiments, taking two bridges intact. f) Netherlands American Cemetery, Margraten, Netherlands, Plot …, Row 15, Grave 6. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

JARVIS, Julian W.

JARVIS, Julian W., Sgt, 3973059, DOB January 13, 1925. a) Bradensburg, Maryland. b) Sept 12, 1943 – March 1944. c) August 30, 1944 at Kerlouan, France, vicinity of Brest in Brittany. d) L Co., 9th Regt., 2nd Infantry Division. e) Stanton: The Second Infantry Division advanced across the Vire River and took Tichebray on August 15, 1944. On August 17, it entered Brittany and on August 25 began the assault on the strong outer defenses of the German fortified city of Brest and seized Hill 105 which dominated the eastern approaches. f) Unites States Military Cemetery at St. Lo. Reinterred July 9, 1948 at Arlington National Cemetery, Virginia, Section 12, Site 2390. g) Niece, Eileen M. Jarvis, … Court, Fairfax, Virginia 22032. h) Julian was one of five brothers who served in the military during WW II. She said that he had been in the army only a year and three weeks at the time of his death, but had already read a letter to Julian’s mother from Headquarters 9th U, S. Infantry at Fort Lewis, Washington; the letter advised Mrs. Jarvis that a chapel at Fort Lewis had been dedicated to “… Julian, and to the other men who bravely fought and died for our country while members of this famous Regiment.” Julian received the Purple Heart Medal and the Combat Infantry Badge.

JEHLE, Charles W.

JEHLE, Charles W., PFC. 37647566. a) West Liberty, Iowa. b) 10/2/44? c) 9 June 1945, Hill 95, Okinawa. d) 11/7. e) Stanton: On 26 May 1945, the 7th Infantry Division ran into enemy strongpoints covering Shuri. The division seized key positions by the end of the month in spite of this opposition and reached the southeast coast of Okinawa on 1 June 1945. The battle for Hill 95 began 5 June 1945 as the 17th and 32nd Regiments used naval gunfire, corps artillery, and flame throwing tanks. f) Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii. Plot E, Row 0, Grave 794. g) Kent L. Jehle, nephew, 5094 Lower West Ranch Road, SE, Iowa City, Iowa; (913) 356-5832, daytime. Additional information provided by Carl A Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666. h) Bronze Star Medal (left), Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

JEMES, William Wilfred

JEMES, William Wilfred, Pvt., 37645472. a) Lebanon, Missouri. b) A/83/15, Aug – Dec 1944. c) 20 March 1945, Germany. d) 304th Inf. e) Died while crossing the Moselle River. f) Mount Zion Cuba Cemetery, Wright County, Missouri. g) Wilbert W. Amos, 301 E. Fremont, Lebanon, Missouri 65536-4365. “I knew him before we went into the service and we were in the same barracks at Camp Fannin. I learned of his death from friends.” h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

JOHNSON, Lionel F.

JOHNSON, Lionel F. a) Snyder, Texas_ b) Fall 43-Spring 44, B/63/13. c) 1944 or 45, Philippines. g) J. D. Henley, 12321 Swanson, Marana, Arizona 85653. In same company at Fannin. J.D. says: “In 1948 or 49 I worked for Calloway Cartage, Ft. Worth, Texas. Lionel F. Johnson’s tombstone came onto my loading dock and I taped a letter to it. A few days later his mother wrote and said he was killed in the Philippine Islands.”

JOHNSON, Thurman A.

JOHNSON, Thurman A., Pvt., 38532706. a) Texas. c) 14 Oct. 44, near Wuerselen, Germany. d) 116/29. e) Stanton: The 116th Infantry Regiment was detached from the 29th Div. and participated in the Urbach Bridgehead Battle 5 Oct., and the Gap fighting 13 Oct. 44, and frontally assaulted Wuerselen. f) Netherlands American Cemetery, Margaten, Netherlands, Plot L, Row 18, Grave 4. g) Bart J. Engram, 1214 McLynn Ave. NE, Atlanta, Georgia 30306. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

JOHNSTON, Roy E.

JOHNSTON, Roy E., Pvt. a) Glenlyn, Virginia. b) Fall 1943. c) May 14, 1944, Italy. t) Peterstown Cemetery, Rich Creek, Virginia. Added 13 March 2014, courtesy Shane Olson. Previously reported missing in action; body not recovered. g) Shane Olson, Adjutant, 9th District Sons of American Legion, 216 Railroad Avenue South, Halma, Minnesota 56729-2908, who learned of his death while researching for soldiers killed during the war. h) Entered the service August 1943, trained at Camp Fannin, arrived in Italy March I 944, reported missing in action on May 14. Age 29 at death. Survivors included wife. An 8-year employee of the Chrisiianburg Canning Company, finally 1n charge of produce sales in the West Virginia territory where “he made an enviable record for three years before being called to military duty.” Purple Heart, Combat Infaniry Badge.

JUMPER, Isaac Wilmer

JUMPER, Isaac Wilmer, Pvt., 38686968. a) Quinlan, Texas. b) May 25-Oct. 26, 1944, D/58/12. c) 17 Jan. 45, Schoppen, Belgium. d) F /I 6/1. e) Killed by an enemy sheH burst while on a three-man patrol. Per letter to Mrs. Jumper from Headquarters, I 6th Regiment: “Your husband was killed in action on 17 Jan. [945 during an assault by the 16th Infantry against enemy defensive positions on the northern flank of the German Ardennes Salient in Belgium. Advancing through heavy snow, the assault units attacked the enemy positions and occupied a vital road center forcing the enemy to withdraw and hastening the collapse of the enemy’s offensive effort. In this action your husband was instantly killed by the explosion of an enemy artillery shell.” t) Henri Chapelle Cemetery in Belgium, reburied at Wesi Cemetery in Quinlan, Texas. g) Daughter, Carol Jumper Mercer, 6355 Newt Patterson Road, Mansfield, Texas 76063; (817) 478-3827; cwmercer@flash.net, pvtjumper@yahoo.com. h) Bronze Star (left), Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge. Per letter from his company headquarters: “Isaac at all times was a good soldier and was well-liked by both officers and men. He continually displayed the habits and bearing of a soldier and gentleman, and had the real respect and friendship of all who knew hlni. He died as he lived, courageously, in the performance of a difficult mission.” Photo at left shows Memorial Bench at Camp Fannin Memorial on site of the old camp near Tyler, Texas ..

KAHLER, Albert A.

KAHLER, Albert A., Pvt., 37708121. a) Park, Kansas. b) Spring 1944. c) 23 December 1944, Luxemburg. d) F/10/5. e. Stanton: On 16 December 1944 the German Ardennes counteroffensive began, and the 5th Infantry Division relieved the 95th Infantry Division at the Saarlautern bridgehead, attacking out of it 18 December 1944. After slow progress, Waldbilling and Haller fell 25 December 1944. f) Luxembourg American Cemetery, Luxembourg City, Luxembourg, Plot G, Row 10, Grave 17. g) Mary L. Koch, <Idaknow@worldnet.att.net> . h) Before entering the service Albert farmed the home place, his father Joe Kahler having died a year to the day before Albert’s death. Albert Kahler had returned to the front lines in the middle of November after having been hospitalized in England for wounds received September 18 near Arnaville on the Moselle River. Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

KENWELL, Philip E.

KENWELL, Philip E., PFC, 34813458. a) Birmingham, Alabama. b) Sept. 43-Feb. 44, A/53/11. c) 24 Sept. 44, Northern Italy. d) E/351/88. e) Stanton: The 88th Division crossed the Arno River 1 Sept. 44 and continued advancing until relieved 6 Sept. 44 for regroupment. The division was committed back to the front 21 Sept. 44 … and battled on Mt. Acuto and repulsed counterattacks 24 Sept. 44. f) Florence American Cemetery, Florence, Italy, Plot E, Row 11, Grave 14. g) Bart J. Engram, P.O. Box 311774, Enterprise, Alabama 36331. Bart writes: “Philip was my bunkmate during training at Camp Fannin. I was notified by his family shortly after his death.” This additional information provided in a 10 May 2005 letter and e-mail from Bart J. Engram, Jr.: “This information came from Gerry Battino, who served with Philip in Italy: ‘Phil and I were on point when we were fired on by a sniper. He was killed as he tried to locate the sniper’s position. It was a bright, sunny afternoon and the hillside where he fell was so green and shaded by a grove of chestnut trees. It was the most beautiful spot I ever saw in Italy. We were close friends. Not a day goes by that I don’t think of him.'” h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

KINGSLEY, Paul E.

KINGSLEY, Paul E., PFC, DOB September 16, 1925 a) Perth, Kansas. b) Jan.-Aug. 1944. c) 18 Dec. 44, reported missing, at the Siegfried Line east of Climbach. d) 409/103. e) From Wikipedia: The 103rd Division crossed the Zintzel River at Griesbach 10 December. Pushing through Climbach, the 103rd crossed the Lauter River into Germany 15 December and assaulted the outer defenses of the Siegfried Line. f) American Military Cemetery, St. Avoid, France, reinterred after the war at Sacred Heart Cemetery, Sumner County, Kansas, next to his brother Dale who had been killed while in the Army Air Corps. g) Sister, Verna Welsh, 3339 Bellaire Court, Wichita, Kansas; (316) 682-9440; e-mail Welshmailman@aol.com. Mrs. Welsh writes: “I was only 10 years old when Paul was killed. Sometime in 1945 my parents received notice from the government that Paul’s orders were mixed up and he should not have been sent to Germany, since we was not fully recovered from spinal meningitis for which he had been hospitalized at Fannin on 26 May 1944. I hope someone will remember my brother and either write to me or e-mail me.” Additional information provided by Shane Olson, Halma, Minnesota, and Michelle Agriesti.and Debbie Volavka. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

KINNEAR, David

KINNEAR, David. c) 21 Jan. 45, near Reipertsweiler, France. d) I/157/45. e) Stanton: The 45th Division battled in the Bitchie Pocket and captured Wingen 7 Jan. 45, but was forced out of Althorn by counterattacks 11 Jan. 45, and a battalion of the 157th was decimated northeast of Reipertsweiller 18 Jan. 45. The division was forced back to defensive positions along the Rothbach Rau-Moder River line 20 Jan. 45. g) Leo S. Jensen, 195 Horseshoe Circle, Athens, Georgia 30605. Leo writes: “David Kinnear was a cadreman at Camp Fannin at the time I was there. He was one of my buddies and is pictured in my book Dear Folks. See also item about Leo on p. 8 of the Spring 1996 Camp Fannin Guidon.

KIRKPATRICK, Eugene

KIRKPATRICK, Eugene, Sgt., or August 1944. ? e) Stanton: The 99th Division landed entered the line north of the Roer River “Web/search says he was shot by foxhole, as stated by Military Cemetery, Henri-Chapelle, Belgium, Masonic Cemetery, Piedmont, Missouri Combat Infantry Badge. His niece Posted.

KLINE, Albert M. Jr.

KLINE, Albert M. Jr., Pvt., 35828753. DOB 1925 near Alsace, France, on German border. 103rd
Division crossed the Zintzel River on 10 December. and assaulted the outer defenses, Purple Heart,
Combat Infantry.

KUEHN, Robert J.

KUEHN, Robert J., 2nd Lt., O-538743. a) Wisconsin. b) B/83/15. c) 17 Dec. 44, France. d) 320/35. e) Stanton: The 35th Division attacked along the Blies 12 Dec. 44 where the 134th Inf. was subjected to fierce German counterattacks at Habkirken…The 137th Inf was driven out of Breiterwald…and on 19 Dec. 44 the division halted its offensive and moved to Metz for rehabilitation. f) Lorraine American Cemetery, St. Avold, France, Plot J, Row 4, Grave 6. g) Leo S. Jensen, 195 Horseshoe Circle, Athens, Georgia 30605. See also item about Leo on p. 8 of the Spring 1996 Camp Fannin Guidon. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

KWIECINSKI, Leo E.

KWIECINSKI, Leo E., 33925253. a) Pennsylvania. c) 4 March 1945 d) L/274/70. e) Stanton: The 274th and 275th Regiments cleared the heights commanding both Saarbruecken and Stiring Wendel by 24 February 1945. The division attacked beyond the Forbach-Saarbruecken Road on 3 March 1945, supported by the 12th Armored Division. The 274th finally captured Stiring Wendel on 5 March 1945. f) Epinal American Cemetery, Epinal, France, Plot A, Row 40, Grave 26. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666, C/58/13 at Fannin and C/276/70 in ETO. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

LARANCE, Willis Allen

LARANCE, Willis Allen, Pvt., 38633432. a) Albany, Texas. c) 14 March 45, near Hatzenport, Germany. d) E/359/90. e) Stanton: The 90th Division assaulted across the Moselle River in the Kattenes-Moselkern region 14 Mar. 45. f) National Cemetery, Hamm, Luxembourg. g) Wife, Mrs. Auddrena Larance Smith, P.O. Box 831, Albany, Texas 76430. Mrs. Smith writes: “Willis did not get to complete his basic training at Camp Fannin. He and a number of his comrades were sent as replacements to Europe. I took him to the airport in Big Springs, Texas. He made it through the Battle of the Bulge, but was killed on 14 March 1945. His company suffered massive casualties and I was told the Army took them to Hamm, Luxembourg for burial. We had a young son when Willis was in training at Fannin and our daughter was born after he was killed.” h)) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

LARSON, Stanley E.

LARSON, Stanley E., PFC, 36676476. a) Rochelle, Illinois. b) Aug-Nov 43, D/63/13. c) 16 December 1944, near Hofen, Belgium. d) 394/99. e) Stanton: The 99th Infantry Division landed at Le Havre, France on 3 November 1944 and assembled at Aubel, Belgium, and entered the line north of the Roer River between Schmidt and Monschau on 9 November 1944. After a period of defensive patrolling, the division attacked toward the Roer and Urft Dams on 13 December 1944 against heavy resistance from the West Wall. On 16 December 1944 the German Ardennes Counteroffensive hit the division, which was partially surounded and suffered heavy losses before Elsenborn Ridge. f) MIA, Tablets of the Missing at Ardennes American Cemetery, Neupre, Belgium. g) Leon St. Pierre, 3325 Bain Place, Tyler, Texas 75701-8871. Same company at Fannin, both in 99th overseas. From official list of battle deaths, 99th Inf. Div. h) Bronze Star Medal, Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

LAURIA, Joseph Ralph

LAURIA, Joseph Ralph, PFC, 32953165. a) West New York, New Jersey b) 1943-44. c) 13 July 1944, near St. Lo, France. d) G/320/35. e) Stanton: The 35th Infantry Division arrived over Omaha Beach, France 5-8 July 1944 and the 137th Infantry Regiment attacked along the Vire 11 July 1944…The 320th Infantry Regiment held to small gains north of St. Lo. On 14 July 1944, the division was able to reach the Pont Hebert-St. Lo Highway. f ) Interred U. S. Military Cemetery, La Cambe, France, disinterred 31 October 1947 and returned to U. S. for burial in Veterans plot at Flower Hill Cemetery, North Bergen, New Jersey, in February 1948. g) Nephew, Ralph P. Simeone, esimeone@ptd.net, 116 Plum Lane, Milford, Pennsylvania 18337, who writes, “Joseph’s mother Clara and his siblings, Ralph, Clara, Mary and James are all deceased and had no idea how he died. We just [2005] received his Individual Deceased Personnel File.” h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

LEE, Wayford

LEE, Wayford, Pvt., 38532757. a) Texas. c) 22 Sept. 44, Southern France. d) 179/45. e) Stanton: The 179th saw heavy combat at Meximieux 1-2 Sept. 44. In heavy fighting, Villersexel was seized 13 Sept. 44 and the 179th crossed the Moselle in the Chatel area 21-22 Sept. 44. f) Epinal American Cemetery, Epinal, France, Plot B, Row 8, Grave 72. g) Bart J. Engram, 1214 McLynn Ave. NE, Atlanta, Georgia 30306. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

LELLELID, Imar H.

LELLELID, Imar H., PFC, 37581714. a) Moody County, South Dakota. b) Jan,-April 44, 82nd Bn g) Waldemar Framstad, 3021 Shore Drive, Apt. 105, Marinette, Wisconsin 54143, who says: “all I remember is his last name, because it is a Norwegian name.”(Update: 28 Jan 2020)

LINDHOLM, John Milton

LINDHOLM, John Milton, Sgt., 39862039. a) Warren, Arizona. b) Aug.-Nov. 1943, D/63/13. c) 17 Dec. 44, vicinity of Elsenborn Ridge, Belgium. d) M/393/99. e) Per Aug. 45 letter to Johnny’s parents from his company commander, Capt. J.E. Veneklasen: “John was in command of a machine gun squad in the line, and when I assigned his friend Sgt. (now Lt.) Malcolm Pierson [also in same Fannin company and in ASTP at LSU with Johnny] to a mortar squad, I called John in to see if he wanted to be a reconnaissance sergeant.

This meant that he would live in the company command post and work with the reconnaissance officer and me. He hesitated since he did not want to leave his squad, but decided to take the job…Then when the German offensive started December 16, we found ourselves hit on all sides, and pretty much surrounded, but we held our position. That night John stayed in the same foxhole with the first sergeant and myself, taking turns at watch. On the 17th, things were no better, and John occasionally made the rounds of the gun positions, checking to see if all was well. On one trip he saw several Germans in the woods with men in American uniforms. Since the Germans had been using our uniforms to penetrate our lines, he decided to investigate, and dashed across the road. That is the last time we saw him. John was a brilliant boy (the highest IQ in the company), fearless, and with a mature head, which gained him the respect of all the officers and men despite his youth [age 19 at death].”

Stanton: The 99th Infantry Division landed at Le Havre, France on 3 November 1944 and assembled at Aubel, Belgium, and entered the line north of the Roer River between Schmidt and Monschau on 9 November 1944. After a period of defensive patrolling, the division attacked toward the Roer and Urft Dams on 13 December 1944 against heavy resistance from the West Wall. On 16 December 1944 the German Ardennes Counteroffensive hit the division which was partially surounded and suffered heavy losses before Elsenborn Ridge. f) Remains not recovered. MIA, Tablets of the Missing at Ardennes American Cemetery, Neupre, Belgium. g) John McGilvray, P.O. Box 164, Bolton Landing, New York 12814, same company at Fannin, together in ASTP at Lousiana State University and in combat with the 99th. See also story in Camp Fannin Guidon, Winter 1993-94, “So long, Johnny Lindholm”. Picture here shows Johnny at the end of basic training at Fannin. h) Bronze Star Medal, Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

LIPPERT, Vernon E.

LIPPERT, Vernon E., Pvt., a) Verona, LaMoure County, North Dakota. c) 24 Jan 1945, near Aldringen, Belgium. f) American Military Cemetery, 3 February 2016.

LLOYD, Richard B.

LLOYD, Richard B., PFC, 39333746. a) Washington state. b) July-Oct. 43, 68/14. c) 12 Nov. 44, Alsace, France. d) 410/103. e) Stanton: The division arrived at Marseille, France on 20 Oct. 44 and relieved the 3rd Inf. Div. at Chevry 8-9 Nov. 44. f) American Cemetery, Epinal, France, Plot B, Row 3, Grave 16. g) Harold O. Rorem, 4112 Janet Lane, Brooklyn Center, Minnesota 55429, who writes: “Took basic training at Camp Fannin at the same time, ASTP at Texas A&M together, and together in the 103rd.” Death listed on page 78 of 103rd Div. history, “The Trail of the Cactus”. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

LOCKHART, Charles

LOCKHART, Charles, PFC, 35757553, DOB Nov. 3, 1924. a) Wood County, West Virginia . b) C/56/12. c) April 15, 1945, near Asin, Luzon, north of Baguio. d) 130/33. e) Stanton: The 130th Infantry Regiment captured Asin on 12 April 1945, but further advance was halted by a Japanese tunnel complex nearby. Ground assault of the Asin Tunnels was suspended 15 April 1945 while artillery bombardment was employed to soften up the strongpoint. f) Foley Cemetery, South Parkersburg,Wood County, West Virginia. g) Gale F. Keen, P.O. Box 162, Spencer, West Virginia 25276, fellow trainee at Fannin. Charles’ girl friend wrote to Gale about his death. Further information provided in July 2009 by Shane Olson of Halma, Minnesota, who provided a grave memorial page created by Theresa Lockhart Stockdale. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

LORD, Eugene J.

LORD, Eugene J., PFC, 36977975. b) C/59/12. c) 25 December 1944, Battle of Bulge. d) 318/80. e) Stanton: The division assembled in the Arlon, Luxembourg area 20 December 1944 and took Merzig after heavy combat on 23 December 1944. It contained numerous German attacks at Heiderscheid and Ettelbruck and advanced to the Sauer on 24 December 1944. The division checked German assaults near Ringel and blocked roads around Ettelbruck and Mostroff. f) Luxembourg American Military Cemetery. g) Son, Daniel J. Lord, 643 Lexington Drive, Saline, MI 48176. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

LOWERY, Samuel L.

LOWERY, Samuel L., PFC, 34160018. a) Fort Payne, DeKalb County, Alabama. Turner, 507 W. Wilson St,,Tyler, Texas, was a mess sergeant in Fannin unit friend. He loved life but it didn’t last long.” Updated 29 Jan 2020.

LUCE, Thomas W.

LUCE, Thomas W., Pvt., 38481401. a) Texas. b) Jan.-May 44. c) 16 Aug. 44, St. Malo, France. d) G/329/83. e) Stanton: The 83rd reached the fortified city of St. Malo 4 Aug 44. It began the Battle of St. Malo the same day and forced back German defenders to the strongpoints of The Citadel and Dinard 9 Aug. 44. Dinard fell after severe fighting 15 Aug. 44 and The Citadel surrendered after further combat on 17 Aug. 44. f) Brittany, France. g) William H. Ayers, Rt. 10, Box 8170, Lufkin, Texas 75904, who writes: “Trained with him at Camp Fannin, stationed at Ft. Meade, Maryland together, and shipped to France on the same ship. Learned of his death upon my return home.” h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

LYMAN, James, M.

LYMAN, James, M.,, Tech/Sgt. 37023623. a) South Dakota. b) Spring 44. c) 16 March 45, vicinity Salvera, Italy. d) 11th AIB, 1st Armored Division. e) Stanton: The 1st Armored Division took Carviano 8 March 1945 and fought for Salvaro 15-27 March. Esther Lyman, Jim’s wife, wrote the following to Mrs. Lois Whiteman on 1 July 1945: “One of the fellows who was in Jim’s company is home now. He said it happened at night and it was machine-gun fire while they were taking a town in northern Italy.” f) Brittany American Cemetery, St. James, France, Plot F, Row 1, Grave 7. g) Mrs. Kim Groff, 6414 Shoreline Drive, Little Elm, Texas 75068, phone (972) 294-8160, e-mail <kgroff@sbcglobal,net>. Mrs. Groff is author of The Fitzgerald House, which memorializes the home at 815 South Broadway Avenue in Tyler where Mrs. Lois Whiteman welcomed so many Fannin service men during the war. Mrs. Groff discovered letters to Mrs. Whiteman from many whom she had befriended including Esther Lyman, and some of Mrs. Lyman’s letters appear in her book. Additional information provided by Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666. h) Silver Star, Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

LYNN, Felmer Lonzo (“Pete”)

LYNN, Felmer Lonzo (“Pete”), Pfc., 34963373. a) Kings Mountain, North Carolina. b) March-July 1944, C/84/15. c) November 2, 1944 near Kommerscheidt, Germany during Hurtgen Forest Campaign. d) B/112/28. e) Stanton: On 26 October 1944, the 28th U.S. Infantry Division takes over the sector of the battle-weary 9th U.S. Infantry Division. The reinforced 28th U.S. Infantry Division is given the mission to secure the Vossenack/Schmidt/Lammersdorf area and to attack the German troops in the Monschau Corridor from the rear. H-hour will be 0900 hours on 2 November 1944, which is All Souls’ Day. Therefore, the records will later come to refer to this battle as the ‘All Souls’ Day Battle.’ At 0800 hours on 2 November 1944, American artillery opens fire. One hour later, the first infantry companies leave their positions in Germeter, protected by tanks. On 8 November 1944, the American troops break off combat action. Under cover of darkness, the remnants of the 112th Infantry Regiment are extracted – 300 out of formerly 2,200 men. f) First buried at Henri Chapelle American Military Cemetery, Grave 190. Body returned to Kings Mountain, North Carolina November 13, 1947. Buried in Mountain Rest Cemetery, Kings Mountain, N. C. g) Daughter, Felma Lynn Bass, 55 Allison Lane, Sparta, North Carolina 28675, born after her father’s death. h) “My father had just turned 34 years old when he was killed,” his daughter writes. “He was killed on my mother’s 29th birthday. I had two older sisters who were 3 and 2 at the time of his death.”

MANKE, Luther

MANKE, Luther, Cpl. b) 1944-45, B/82/15. c) May 14, 1945, Okinawa. g) Frank A. Smith, <ab034@earthlink.net>, via Cpl. Manke’s niece, Janette Chambers, <jc4christ@juno.com>. h) Frank A. Smith writes: “Cpl. Manke was cadre and had a bunk in our barracks all the time I was in basic, from December 1944 to April 1945. He was the only cadre in our barracks.”

MARTIN, Raymond

MARTIN, Raymond, Pvt., 38550113. a) Kennard, Texas. b) Fall 1944, C/63/13. c) 2 December 1944, Camp Fannin, Texas. d) C/63/13. e) Death accidentally occurred on firing range; dead on arrival at Station Hospital. f) Sardis Cemetery, Rusk, Texas. g) Son, Raymond H. Martin, 1374 County Road 4700, Kennard, Texas 75847.

MARTIN, Robert

MARTIN, Robert. a) Telford, Tennessee. b) Aug.-Dec. 44, C/68/14. c) ETO. g) Carl D. Mathes, 6760 Lee Ave., Radford, Virginia 24141. In same company at Fannin, separated at Ft. Meade, Maryland.

MATLOCK, Clayton F

MATLOCK, Clayton F. b) 1944, C/82. c) 2 May 1944, Camp Fannin. e) One of two 82nd Battalion trainees (the other was James J. Cox, Jr. of A/82) crushed by trees blown down by a sudden violent windstorm while the battalion was on bivouac. g) Ruby Neilson, 417 Bond St., Hillsboro, Texas 76645, widow of former CFA president Gordon Neilson. Ruby was a reporter on The Tyler Courier-Times when she and Gordon met and she found the story about Clayton F. Matlock’s death in the May 2, 1944 edition of The Tyler Courier-Times. See also story in Spring 1997 edition of Camp Fannin Guidon.

McCOY, John F

McCOY, John F., 36758561. a) Chicago, Illinois. b) Aug.-Nov. 43, D/63/13. c) ETO. d) 393/99. g) Elmer T. Horne, Jr., Tallahassee, Florida. Same company at Fannin, then together in ASTP at La. St. Univ. Official list of battle deaths, 99th Inf. Div., provided by Leon St. Pierre, Tyler, Texas. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

MCGUINESS, William T.

MCGUINESS, William T., Pvt., 42180059. a) Kings County, New York. b) Sept-Dec. 1944, 58/12. c) March 15, 1945, at Siegfried Line south of Zwiebrucken, Germany. d) 30th Regt., 3rd Inf. Div. e) Stanton: At the end of January 1945, the 3rd Infantry Division took Horbourg and was at the outskirts of Colmar. On March 15, the division struck Siegfried Line positions south of Zweibrucken. f) Lorraine American Cemetery, St. Avold, France, Plot F, Row 7, Grave 7. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666, a fellow-trainee at Fannin, and Shane Olson, Halma, Minnesota, who provided numerous additional details in July 2009. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

MILLER, Roy

MILLER, Roy, Pvt. a) Oran, Missouri. b) June-September 1944. c) Italy. g) Viola M. Errett, 3024 Sunnybrook Drive, Tyler, Texas. Roy Miller and his wife Gayle and daughter Brenda (6 months) were Mrs. Errett’s neighbors while he was a trainee at Fannin.

MILLEREN, Donald W.

MILLEREN, Donald W., 35147983. a) Gary, Indiana. b) Aug.-Nov. 43, D/63/13. c) ETO. d) 393/99. g) Elmer T. Horne, Jr., Tallahassee, Florida. Same company at Fannin, then together in ASTP at La. St. Univ. Official list of battle deaths, 99th Inf. Div. , provided by Leon St. Pierre, Tyler, Texas. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

MITHELMAN, Robert K.

MITHELMAN, Robert K. a) Minnesota. b) Oct. 43 – March 44, C/81. c) About midway through the Luzon operation, P.I. d) 1/6. e) Stanton: 1st Inf. Regt. left New Guinea 26 Dec. 44, assaulted Lingayen Gulf Philippine Islands on Luzon 9 Jan. 45. g) Wayne A. Miller, 524 W. 18th, Kearny, Nebraska , in same company at Fannin and same regiment in combat. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

MOLLETT, Delbert C.

MOLLETT, Delbert C., Pvt., 35242332. a) Ohio. c) 17 Oct. 1944. f) Ardennes American Cemetery, Belgium. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge. Updated 5 February 2020.

MONNOT, Richard G.

MONNOT, Richard G., PFC, 36676541. a) Chicago, Illinois. b) Aug.-Nov. 43, D/63/13. c) 19 December 1944, near Elsenborn Ridge, Belgium. d) L/393/99. e) Stanton: The 99th Infantry Division landed at Le Havre, France on 3 November 1944 and assembled at Aubel, Belgium, and entered the line north of the Roer River between Schmidt and Monschau on 9 November 1944. After a period of defensive patrolling, the division attacked toward the Roer and Urft Dams on 13 December 1944 against heavy resistance from the West Wall. On 16 December 1944 the German Ardennes Counteroffensive hit the division which was partially surrounded and suffered heavy losses before Elsenborn Ridge on 19 December 1944. f) Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery, Belgium, Plot D, Row 1, Grave 36. g) Elmer T. Horne, Jr., Tallahassee, Florida, who says: “Richard was one of my best friends during basic training at Fannin and later in ASTP at La. St. Univ. I learned of his death after returning from overseas by a chance encounter at Camp Cooke, California with a 99th Div. soldier who had known him well in combat.” h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

MOREDOCK, James E.

MOREDOCK, James E., Pvt., 37646228, a) Jasper County, Iowa. b) Sept-Dec. 1944, 58/12. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666, a fellow-trainee at Fannin.

MORGAN, Robert J.

MORGAN, Robert J., PFC, DOB July 29, 1917. a) Kirbyville, Texas. b) Fall-43- Spring 44, B/63/13. c) March 3, 1945, approach to Manila, Philippine Islands. d) 128/32. e) Stanton: The 32nd Inf Div landed in Lingayen Gulf on Luzon 27 Jan 45 and began the final phase of the push on Manila . The Battle for Villa Verde Trail was fought 6-22 Feb 45 which included numerous Japanese counterattacks and the division fought battles at Salacsac Pass and along the Arboredo and Ambayang Valleys in March. f) Zion Hill Cemetery, Jasper, Texas. g) J. D. Henley, 12321 Swanson, Marana, Arizona 85653; (602) 682-3614. In same company at Fannin. J.D. says: “I learned of Robert’s death from two other members of our company at Fannin whom I visited after the war, Lenox Hawthorne of Silsby, Texas and Eugene Hryhobchux of Deweyville, Texas.” Additional information provided in July 2009 by Shane Olson, Halma, Minnesota and Don Wilson, Carthage, Texas.. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

MOURIN, Thomas K.

MOURIN, Thomas K., Pvt., 42098437, a) Onondaga County, New York. b) Sept-Dec 1944, D/58/12. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666, a fellow-trainee at NAKAMA, Masao, Sgt., 30111494. a) Hawaii. c) 17 May 1945, Italy. d) 442nd Inf. Regt. (Nisei)(Separate). f) Listed on Honolulu Memorial, Hawaii. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666. h) Bronze Star Medal, Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge..

NANCE, Steve

NANCE, Steve. c) 1945, Germany. e) Killed by “friendly fire”. g) Del M. Edwards, 3600 Jill Circle, Tyler, Texas, from Dr. Bob Glover, past president of Camp Ford Historical Association, Tyler, Texas.

O’BRIEN, John R.

O’BRIEN, John R., PFC, 11131809. a) Cambridge, Massachusetts. b) Aug.-Nov. 43, D/63/13. c) 19 Dec. 1944, Hofen, Belgium. d) I/395/99. e) German machine gun sprayed house six Co. I men were in at night. Stanton: On 16 Dec. 44 the German Ardennes Counteroffensive hit the division which initially held at Hofen but gave ground to the south. The division was partially surrounded and suffered heavy losses as it retreated to new defensive positions before Elsenborn Ridge on 19 Dec. 44. f) Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery, Belgium, Plot G, Row 11, Grave 49.g) Leon W. St. Pierre, first CFA president, 3325 Bain Place, Tyler, Texas 75701. In same company during basic at Fannin and both were in combat with the 99th during the Battle of the Bulge. Leon writes: “George Prager [also in the same company at Fannin and in combat with the 99th] told me about John O’Brien’s death several years ago at a 99th Division reunion. I have corresponded with John’s brother, Brendan J. O’Brien, 2278 Wood Acres Court, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15237.” h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

ODEM, Dale Raymond

ODEM, Dale Raymond, Pvt., 37691916. a) Atlantic, Iowa. b) March-July 1944. c) 6 Feb. 1945, Luzon, P.I. d) 511 Prcht, 11 ABN Div. e) Stanton: The 511 Parachute Infantry Regiment was parachuted along Tagaytay Ridge, Luzon on 3 Feb. 45, enabling the 11th Airborne Division to completely clear it. The 511th PIR then advanced toward Manila and seized the Paranaque River bridge at the south end of the city on 5 Feb. 1945. All three regiments [187th Glider, 188th PIR, 511th PIR] were involved in fierce fighting to secure Nichols Field 7-13 Feb. 1945 and then flanked Fort McKinley 12-16 Feb 1945 and captured it on 17 Feb. 1945. The division next conducted a combined overland, amphibious, and parachute assault to liberate prisoners at the Japanese internment Camp at Los Banos 23 Feb. 1945. f) Manila American Cemetery and Memorial, P.I., Plot N, Row 1, Grave 55. g) Clark Merrill Trailer, 1009 Elm Street, Atlantic, Iowa 50022-2133, who writes: “We were childhood friends. We met again when we were inducted at Camp Dodge, Iowa. I had forgotten that Dale’s service number was the very next one after mine. We were in different units at Fannin. At the end of basic he looked me up and told me that he was joining the paratroops.” h) Dale was an only child, 19 at the time of his death. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

OGG, William H.

OGG, William H., PFC. a) Dayton, Ohio. b) Sept. 44-Jan. 45. c) 27 May 45, Okinawa. d) 32/7. e) Stanton: The 7th division rehabilitated 12-21 May 45 and on May 22 it returned to the front , driving unopposed through the Yonabaru ruins to the hills beyond. On 26 May 45 the 32nd Inf ran into enemy strongpoints covering Shuri. The division had seized key positions by the end of the month. f) Memorial Park Cemetery, Dayton, Ohio. g) James R. Carpenter, 1673 W. Stroop, Dayton, Ohio. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

OLIVER, Allie J.

OLIVER, Allie J. c) 29 Aug. 44, France. d) E/120/30. e) Stanton: The 30th relieved the 1st Inf. Div. near Mortrain 6 Aug. 44. It was subjected to a strong German counterattack which ruptured its lines during the Battle for Avranches. The Division then pushed east behind the 2nd Armd. Div., taking Nonancourt 21 Aug. 44. It crossed into Belgium 2 Sept. 44. g) Vito Ludovico, 900 N. Azalea Drive, Tyler, Texas 75701-5203. Accompanying note says: “Allie was the brother of a dear friend of ours. We were sitting together at a funeral and he was asking about Camp Fannin Association, etc.”. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

OLSEN, Emil.

OLSEN, Emil. b) Aug.-Nov. 43, B/63/12. c) 15 May 1945, Germany. d) 14th Armd. Div. e) Emil was a guard for the CG of the 14th. e) Stanton: The 14th Armd crossed the Isar River at Moosberg 30 Apr. 45 and fought into Landshut. Combat Command B reached the Inn River near Aschau and took the bridge there intact on 2 May 45. The division was then used to process prisoners as hostilities were declared ended on 7 May 1945. Emil was accidentally killed on 15 May 45. g). Leo S. Jensen, 195 Horseshoe Circle, Athens, Georgia 30605, in same company at Fannin.

OLSON, Dean H.

OLSON, Dean H., PFC, 11108056, DOB May 31, 1925. a) West Springfield, Massachusetts. b) Aug.-Nov. 43, D/63/13. c) November 26, 1944, east of Hofen, Germany. d) C/395/99. e) Stanton: The 99th Infantry Division landed at Le Havre, France on 3 November 1944 and assembled at Aubel, Belgium, and entered the line north of the Roer River between Schmidt and Monschau on 9 November 1944. Dean was killed on a night patrol in the icy no-man’s land soon to be in the path of the German Ardennes Offensive. Ray Prill, who was with Dean all the way from Camp Fannin almost to the moment of his death, says Dean came by his position and asked for an extra ammunition belt because he was going on a night patrol. Ray handed it to him and Dean took off. About 15 seconds later there was a loud explosion. Dean had apparently stepped on a land mine and he died almost instantly from a severed jugular and other injuries. f) Arlington National Cemetery, Virginia, Section 12, #2705. g) Elmer T. Horne, Jr., 2213 Mendoza Avenue, Tallahassee, Florida 32304-1339. In same company at Fannin, then together in ASTP at La. St. Univ. From official list of battle deaths, 99th Inf. Div. Much additional information provided in 2009 by Dean’s cousin Nancy Wertz of Plano, Texas, and a friend, Bill McCarron, Commerce, Texas, who are preparing to publish Dean’s letters. Nancy found Ray Prill’s phone number and Bill called Ray in August 2009 and learned the details of Dean’s death. Ray’s address: Raymond P. Prill, 766 Grosse Pointe Circle, Vernon Hills, Illinois 60061-3413; 847-566-4129. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

OUTHWAITE, Eric R.

OUTHWAITE, Eric R., Pvt. a) Pretty Prairie, Kansas. b) Aug.-Dec. 1944. c) 21 February 1945, Luxembourg. d) 5th Armd. Div. e) A shell exploded close to his position and fragments struck and killed him. g) E. Olen Mitchell, 2405 Colorado Street, Hutchinson, Kansas 67502. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

OYABU, Harumatsu.

OYABU, Harumatsu. d) L/100/442 Inf. Regt. (Nisei)(Separate). Campaigns: Naples-Foggia, Anzio, Rome-Arno, North Apennines, Rhineland, Po Valley. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

PETERSON, James Hans

PETERSON, James Hans, PFC, 39926104. a) Moreland, Idaho. c) 19 March 1945, Germany. d) 3rd Army. f) Moreland General Cemetery, Moreland, Idaho. g) Son, James Stoddard Peterson, 504 Oak Grove Road, San Marcos, Texas 78666, who writes, “I was a year old when my father died. My mother told me when I was old enough to understand.” h) Telegram from War Department to his wife, Mrs. Nora U. Peterson, reads: “PFC James H. Peterson had returned to duty 11 March 1945 from previously reported wound.” He had sent a poem titled “My Prayer” to his wife just prior to his death which reads in part: “God give me strength and courage, In this hour of need, Show me light that I may find, The road that home will lead.” h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

PETTY, Jack

PETTY, Jack, PFC, 38687752. a) Gatesville, Texas. b) May – November 1944. c) 15 January 1945, in a German hospital near Frankfort. d) K/315/79. e) from letter to Jack Petty’s wife dated 16 April 1945 from personnel officer of 315th Regiment: “On 11 January 1945, Company K of which PFC Petty was a member, was defending the town of Rittershoffen, France, against fierce enemy attacks. At about 6 a.m., after a devastating artillery barrage, the enemy’s tanks succeeded in enveloping our forward positions and the company was forced to withdraw to the center of town. When a reorganization was effected, it was discovered that PFC Petty was missing, nor could any information be gathered as to his whereabouts.” It developed that he had been captured, and a letter from his widow, dated 4 February 2006, picks it up at that point: “I have some information that his buddy Frank Wood gave me. Frank and Jack were captured, and behind enemy lines, Jack was wounded by friendly fire. Frank carried Jack as they moved from place to place for two days, then the Germans took Jack to a hospital where he died.” f) Initially buried at Rittershoffen, France, then repatriated and buried at Restland Cemetery in Gatesville, Texas. g) Lee R. Williamson, P.O. Box 1017, Gatesville, Texas 76528-6017, (254) 865-2383; Mrs. Oma Lee Petty Coward, 2210 West U.S. Highway 84, Gatesville, Texas 76528-1055, (254) 865-5789. h) Jack Petty had been in the Army only eight months when he was killed. Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

PHILLIPS, Stanley D.

PHILLIPS, Stanley D., Pvt., 33859561. a) Virginia. b) Sept.-Dec. 1944, A/58/12. c) 17 March 1945. d) B/222/42. e) Stanton: On 14 Feb 1945 the 42nd Inf Div as a whole entered combat, taking up defensive positions near Haguenau in the Hardt Forest. The division attacked through the Hardt Forest and broke through the Seigfried Line 15-21 March 1945. f) Lorraine American Cemetery, St. Avold, France, Plot C, Row 18, Grave 69. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666. h) Silver Star Medal, Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge..

PIEGER, Carl

PIEGER, Carl. b) July 31-Dec. 6, 1943. c) September 1944, France. d) 35th ID. f) Grandview Cemetery, Johnstown, PA. g) Emory A. Domen, 1990 Minno Drive, Johnstown, PA 15905-1172, who had 17 weeks of basic training at Fannin with deceased. Before the war, Carl Pieger owned and operated a meat market across the street from where Emory Domen lived. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

PILLARS, Clifford G.

PILLARS, Clifford G. a) Columbia, Missouri. b) A/82. c) 18 October1944, Luxembourg. d) 329/83. g) L. Chancey, lchancey2@juno.com. , a fellow trainee at Fannin. h) Clifford Pillars was a field wireman at the time of his death. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.BURKLOW, John Ray, Private First Class, 38607507, DOB 8 March 1924. a) Nolan County, Texas. b) A/57. c) 22 September 1944, near Firenzuola, Tuscany, Italy. d) 363rd Infantry Regiment, 9 I st Infantry Division. e) Allied forces had just succeeded in breaching the formidable mountainous Gothic Line, with the 363rd Regiment having driven north through Monticelli in the preceding days. f) Florence American Cemetery and Memorial, Florence, Toscana, Italy, Plot G, Row I, Grave 23. g) Dana Kristin Russell, grandniece, russell.family.tx@gmail.com. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

PIRKEY, Weldon A.

PIRKEY, Weldon A., PFC, 33664107. a) Mt. Crawford, Virginia. b) Sept.-Dec. 44, C/64/13 and C/58/12. c) 6 April 44, France; died of wounds received 11 Mar. d) G/276/70. e) Stanton: The 70th Division attacked beyond the Forbach-Saarbruecken Road on 3 Mar. 45 and divisional patrols reached the outposts of the West Wall on 6 Mar. 45. The German forces withdrew 13 Mar. 45 and the division began pursuit operations immediately. f) U. S. Military Cemetery, Meuse Section, France. Reinterred St. Paul’s Cemetery, Grottoes, Virginia. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666. See also page 8, Spring 1996 issue of Camp Fannin Guidon.

PORTER, Jerald G.

PORTER, Jerald G., 2nd Lt., O-537647. a) Kansas. c) 24 February 1945, near Roermond, Holland. d) C/291/75. e) Stanton: The 75th Infantry Division relieved the British 6th A/B Division along the Maas River near Roermond, Holland on 21 February 1945. f) Netherlands American Cemetery, Margraten, Netherlands, Plot M, Row 10, Grave 17. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

POWELL, David T.

POWELL, David T., PFC, 11121871. a) Pennsylvania. c) November 25, 1944. d) 334/84 f) Netherlands American Cemetery, Margraten, Netherlands, Plot B, Row 21, Grave 11. g) Terry Hirsch, Indianapolis, Indiana. “He left for the army after three terms at Harvard, subsequently was assigned to ASTP at Drexel Institute of Technology.” h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge. Posted 3 February 2016. Updated 5 February 2020.

PRATT, Harold E.

PRATT, Harold E., Pvt., 36915415. a) Michigan. c) 30 April 45, Okinawa. d) 105/27. e) Stanton: The 27th Division made efforts to improve its position, and captured contested Machinato Airfield 28 April 45, and on 1 May 45 was relieved by the 1st Marine Div. and moved to Nago for rest. f) Honolulu Memorial, Hawaii. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666. h) Bronze Star Medal, Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

PYLE, Paul L.

PYLE, Paul L., Capt., O-1294193. a) Newark, Ohio. b) company commander, A/53/11, Sept-Dec 1943. c) 3 Nov. 1944, France. d) B/71/44. e) Stanton: The 44th Infantry Division landed at Cherbourg, France on 15 September 1944 and trained for a month before beginning the relief of of the 79th Infantry Division on 18 October 1944 at Foret de Parroy, in the vicinity of Luneville, France. The 71st Infantry Regiment went into the line 23 October 1944 followed by the 324th the next day. The division was subjected to a strong German counterattack 25-26 October 1944 and then continued active defense of its area.

The 71st and 324th attacked from Leintrey to force a passage through the Vosges Mountains. g) Bart J. Engram, 1214 McLynn Ave., Atlanta, Ga. 30306-2530, and E. Olen Mitchell, 2405 Colorado St., Hutchinson, Kans, 67502, both trainees in Capt. Pyle’s company at Fannin. Additional information provided by Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666. h) Bart provided a page from the company morning report of A/53/11 ending 2400 hours 2 Dec 1943, signed by Capt. Pyle and bearing this entry: “01294193 Pyle, Paul L., Capt., Relieved from assignment and assigned to Infantry Officers Replacement Pool this station and attached thereto 1 Dec 43.”

Additional infomation provided by Bart Engram, Jr., in letter and e-mail dated 10 May 1945: “These details came from the History and Pictorial Record of the 71st Infantry Regiment, published in 1946 in Baton Rouge, La., by The Army and Navy Publishing Company: ‘The 71st Infantry Regiment moved in early November 1944 into Le Remabois Woods to prepare for an attack on the small town of Leintrey. After reaching the edge of the woods where they had a good view of the town, they came under heavy artillery and mortar fire. While directing artillery from an exposed position, Captain Pyle was killed by enemy shell fragments from a tree burst. Many men praised the captain as a brave man and a courageous leader.'”

Bart Engram Jr. writes: “My father thought very highly of Captain Pyle and talked about how he tried to give the soldiers of A Company the best possible training. He led by example and set high standards, but showed a sense of concern for each solider. He remembered how Captain Pyle moved up and down the length of the column on road marches, checking on and encouraging the soldiers. Dad passed away in July 2004 at 94.” Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

RATLIFF, Ova Wendell

RATLIFF, Ova Wendell, Pvt., 35077542. a) Woodsbend, Kentucky. b) March-August, 1944, D/65/14. c) 10 Nov. 1944, Hurtgen Forest. d) C/110/28. e) Assigned 7 Nov 44, reported as missing in action 14 Nov 44, a “finding of death” a year and a day later. Stanton: The 28th Div. attacked toward Schmidt 2 Nov. 44 after heavy artillery preparation and pushed into the Hurtgen Forest and over the next few days heavy fighting caused Vassenack and Schmidt to change hands several times. f) His remains were found in the Hurtgen Forest near the top of Oschenkopf Hill a few hundred yards southwest of the small village of Simonskall near Vossenack. His remains were returned to Woodsbend on 28 May 49, where he was buried in Flatwoods Cemetery. g).

He was 35 years old at time of his death. He had been married for 10 years, and was the father of three children. He taught school in Morgan County, Kentucky for 12 years. He is the subject of two books written by his son, Tom Ratliff, 190 Ethelrob Circle, Carlisle, Ohio 45005-6221. The first book, I Can Hear The Guns Now, has all of his letters home in it, 42 of them were written at Camp Fannin. The second book, Now I Know – A War Orphan’s Journey of Discovery, describes what really happened to him. Both books are available on website www.warorphansjourney.net . h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

RAY, Howell Travis

RAY, Howell Travis, Pvt. a) Ennis, Texas. b) B/51/11, 1944. c) 21 June 1944, Camp Fannin Station Hospital. d) B/51/11 (Fannin). e) Died from heat exhaustion. Although Howell Travis Ray died within a week after the infamous 15 June 1944 “death march” at Fannin, and deaths from heat during the march were reported, it does not appear that Pvt. Ray took part in the “death march”. His regiment, the 11th, did not participate in the march. He had been at Fannin BULLARD, Kenneth, S., PFC 31378758. a) Hartford County, Connecticut. b) Aug-Dec 43, A/81. c) June, 1944, Omaha Beach, Normandy. g) Eric Diller, 504 Via La Selva, Redondo Beach, CA 90277; (310) 375-2024; eddiller@earthlink.net; in same barracks with deceased at Camp Fannin. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.only three weeks, and if he was a trainee, he would not have been marching that distance so early in his basic. g) Ruby Jean Neilson, former CFA corresponding secretary and widow of Gordon Neilson, our late former president.

RAY, John Raymond

RAY, John Raymond, PFC, 38573265. a) Oklahoma. b) C/64/13. c) 24 March 1945, France. d) 357/90. e) Stanton: The 90th Division assaulted across the Moselle River in the Kattenes-Moselkern region 14 March 1945, and attacked across the Nahe River 19 March 1945 to capture Mainz on 22 March 1945. It crossed the Rhine 24 March 1945. f) Lorraine American Cemetery, St. Avold, France, Plot C, Row 31, Grave 60. g) Donna Howe, niece, dcrhowe@comcast.net. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

REED, Gilbert O.

REED, Gilbert O., Pvt., 44046472. a) Mississippi. c) 12 April 1945, Philippine Islands. d) 182/Americal. e) Stanton: The Americal Division left Leyte 24 Mar. 45, and after a one-hour naval bombardment, the division landed at Talisay Cebu and took Cebu City the next day. The 182nd Inf. Regt. fought the Battle of Go Chan Hill 28-29 Mar. 45 and then battled to clear the other hills, being counterattacked heavily on Bolo Ridge 1 Apr. 45. The division fought the Battle of Babay Ridge 12-17 Apr. 45. f) Manila American Cemetery, Philippines, Plot B, Row 9, Grave 157. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

REED, William Hayward

REED, William Hayward, 38482319. a) Coffeeville/Ore City, Texas. b) Dec. 43-Spring 44. c) 10 Jan. 45, France. d) 3rd Bn/314/79. e) Stanton: The 79th Division fought the Battle of Haguenau 9-11 Dec. 44 and reached the Lauter River at Schiebenhardt on 15 Dec. 44 and held defensive lines at Wissembourg until 2 Jan. 45. It then moved to the southern portion of the Rhine River and by 6 Jan. 45 the division had battled through Stattmatten to relieve encircled elements of the task force. German attacks defeated 314th Inf. efforts to take Drusenheim, and by 12 Jan. 45 both 14th Armd. Div. and 103rd Inf. Div. were committed to the battle. f) Buried Epinal, France, but after three years, on 29 April 48, body was sent home for burial in the Coffeeville Cemetery, Coffeeville, Texas. g) Niece, CFA Member Millie Jean Purgerson, Greenville, Texas, who composed a beautiful tribute to her uncle which she delivered at our 1998 reunion (see page 8, Spring 1998 issue of Camp Fannin Guidon). h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

RHODES, Gale L.

RHODES, Gale L., Corporal, 36864512, DOB 13 June 1920. a) Peoria, Illinois. b) 1943, 481st MP Escort Guard Company c) October 14,1943, Camp Fannin, Texas. d) 481st MP Escort Guard Company. e) Circumstances of death not known. f) Golden Gate National Cemetery, San Bruno, California, Section L, Block 2, Site 6238. g) Shane Olson, Adjutant, 9th District Sons of American Legion, 216 Railroad Avenue South, Halma, Minnesota 56729-2908, who learned of his death while researching soldiers from his area killed during the war. h) Headstone shows Michigan, though Illinois was specified. Posted 13 March 2014

RICHARDSON, Fred M.

RICHARDSON, Fred M., Sr., Pvt., 44031646. a) Alabama. c) 15 March 45, Germany. d) 30/3. e) Stanton: The 3rd Div. renewed its offensive against the Colmar [Alsace, France] Pocket on 26 Jan. 45 and crossed the Canal de Colmar on 29 Jan. 45. At the end of the month it took Horbourg and was at the outskirts of Colmar. 30th Inf. entered Germany 13 Mar. 45. f) Lorraine American Cemetery, St. Avold, France, Plot C, Row 23, Grave 73. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

RIDER, Hollis M.

RIDER, Hollis M., Pvt., 37694938, DOB 2/9/1918. a) Garwin, Iowa. b) April-September 1944, C/83/15. c) 27 November 1944, near Kriegsheim, north of Strasbourg, France. d) K/315/79. e) “Company K was attacking the town of Kriegsheim, France. It was a clear day and his company was bravely advancing towards the enemy. The enemy began firing on them with machine gun and rifle fire. At 2 p.m. he was caught in a burst of machine gun fire.” (letter from his daughter). Stanton: The 79th Division took Embermenil 3 October 1944 and battled for the high ground east of the town 15-22 October and was relieved in this area 23 October. It rested at Luneville and returned to the attack 13 November with the 314th and 315th Regiments out of the Montigny area which carried it across the Vezousse with the capture of Fremonville 19 November. It consolidated north of Strasbourg 25 November and began the assault on Haguenau. f) U. S. Military Cemetery, Epinal, France; permanent burial Garwin, Iowa. g) Daughter, Judy Rider Woodbury, 8580 E. Sells Drive, Scottsdale, Arizona 85251, mj2511az@cox.net, 480-945-3180. “If anyone knew my father,” she asks, “please contact me.” Also, son, Ralph James Rider, Murfreesboro, Tennessee. See also Nick Russ’ entry in this Roll of Honor. h) Age at death, 26 years, 10 months. Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

RISCH, Marvin D.

RISCH, Marvin D., Pvt. a) Elkton, South Dakota. b) 1943. c) 15 March 1945, vicinity Colmar, France. d) 3rd Infantry Division. e) Stanton: The Third Infantry Division began its attack toward the Maginot Line on 5 December 1944 and cleared Bennwihr 24 December 1944, after which it was relieved by the 28th Infantry Division. The division renewed its offensive against the Colmar Pocket on 26 January 1945 and crossed the Canal de Colmar on 29 January 1944, then took Horbourg and was on the outskirts of Colmar. It assaulted the West Wall Line 18 March 1945. f) U. S. Military Cemetery St. Avold, France, Plot A, Row 8, Grave 89; reinterred at Fort Snelling National Cemetery, Minneapolis, Minnesota, Section C, Block 3, Grave 7951. g) Hannah Drexler, Kariann Lien, and Derek Wooters, 8th Grade, Brandon Valley Middle School, Brandon, South Dakota. For further information, see <http://www.state.sd.us/military/Vet Affairs/sdwwiimemorial/SubPages/profiles/Display.asp?P=1608> . h) Marvin Risch volunteered and was inducted on August 23, 1944, three weeks after news that his older brother Emery had been killed in action with the 15th U. S. Army Air Force in Italy. Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

RODGERS, Wilson F

RODGERS, Wilson F., PFC, 39209620. a) Washington State. b) July-Oct. 43, B/68/14. c) 16 Nov. 44, Alsace, France. d) K/409/103. e) Killed attacking machine gun position, for which he received the Distinguished Service Cross. e) Stanton: The 103rd Div. arrived at Marseille, France on 20 Oct. 44 and relieved the 3rd Inf. Div. at Chevry 8-9 Nov. 44. It attacked toward St. Die in the Vosges Mountains 16 Nov. 44 and fought through. strong opposition to clear the hill mass below the town. f) American Cemetery, Epinal, France, Plot B, Row 17, Grave 60. g) Harold O. Rorem, 4112 Janet Lane, Brooklyn Center, Minnesota 55429, in the same company and platoon at Fannin, and roommate during ASTP at Texas A&M. “Friends in 103rd told me shortly after his death.” h) Distinguished Service Cross (left), Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

RODMAN, John S.

RODMAN, John S., Pvt., 33925294. a) Pennsylvania. b) Sept.-Dec. 44, D/64/13. c) 28 May 45. d) 71/44. f)Lorraine American Cemetery, St. Avold, France. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

RODRIAN, Roland G.

RODRIAN, Roland G., 2nd Lt., O-1052136. b) 1943, Pay and Records Section, BIRTC. d) 76th Inf. Div. g) Percy C. Menning, 57 Fox Point Drive, Appleton, Wisconsin 54911, a staff sergeant in the Pay and Records Section May 43-March 44. Also a Section member, the late Harley Errett, a warrant officer and husband of CFA Corresponding Secretary Viola Errett. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

ROSEBERRY, Walter F.

ROSEBERRY, Walter F., PFC, 37721699. a) Sedgwick County, Kansas. b) Sept. 43-Jan. 44, C/67/14. d) 1/6. g) Kenneth L. Rigby, 104 E. 19th St., Hays, Kansas 67601-3218, in the same company at Fannin, from 6th Div. list of casualties. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

ROSENBAUM, Chester L.

ROSENBAUM, Chester L., S/Sgt., 37003727. a) Cedar County, Missouri. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666.

ROSENQVIST, Mark D.

ROSENQVIST, Mark D., 37568014. a) Nerstrand, Minnesota. b) July-Oct. 43, B/68/14. c) 1944, France. d) Hq. Co., 23rd Tank Bn., 12th Armd. Div., tank driver. f) Nerstrand, Minnesota. g) Harold O. Rorem, 4112 Janet Lane, Brooklyn Center, Minnesota 55429, in the same company and platoon at Fannin, and roommate during ASTP at Texas A&M. Learned of Mark’s death through mutual friends in 12th Armd. “I visited his parents after the war.” h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

ROSS, Fred C. , Jr.

ROSS, Fred C. , Jr., PFC, 18214622. a) Ft. Worth, Texas. b) A/66/14, July-Oct. 1943. c) 16 November 1944, near St. Die in Vosges Mountains. d) 409/103. e) Stanton: The 103rd Infantry Division arrived at Marseille, France on 20 October 1944 and relieved the 3rd Infantry Division at Chevry 8-9 November 1944. It attacked toward St. Die in the Vosges Mountains 16 November 1944 and fought through strong opposition to clear the hill mass below the town. f) Epinal American Cemetery, Epinal, France, Plot A, Row 35, Grave 3. g) Charlie E. Seyster, Col., USAF Ret., 205 Shoreline Drive, Malakoff, Texas 75148. Col. Seyster and Fred Ross were in college together at Texas A&M before induction, trained together at Fannin, then were in ASTP together at Texas Tech. When ASTP folded, Fred Ross was shipped to an infantry division at Camp Howze, Texas and Col. Seyster to Engineer OCS at Ft. Belvoir, Virginia. Further information provided by Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

ROY, John David

ROY, John David, Pvt., 35083632, DOB March 20, 1911. a) Chicago, Illinois b) May- September 1944 c) March 16, 1945, Frorath, Germany, east of the Rhine between Bonn and Koblenz d) G/2/393/99 e) Killed by friendly fire, artillery laid down short of enemy target, shrapnel wound in back. Stanton: The 99th crossed the Rhine at Remagen March 10-11 and took over the southern flank of the bridgehead, withstanding counterattacks and expanding it through the Honnigen Wall into Honnigen which fell after heavy combat by March 16. f) Henri-Chapelle American Military Cemetery, Belgium, Plot D, Row 4, Grave 60. g) son, Tom Roy, 541 Evans, Missoula, Montana 59801, <tomandsue@bresnan.net>. h) Bronze Star Medal, Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

RUSS, Nick

RUSS, Nick. b) April-September 1944, C/83/15. c) December 1944. Nick trained with Hollis M. Rider, who was also killed in action, on November 27, 1944. We have no further information on Nick Russ and will greatly appreciate any information you can provide. Hollis M. Rider’s wife Betty prepared a scrapbook for her two children, who were four and almost two at the time of his death, which had a notation under Nick Russ’ picture that he was killed in action December 1944. Hollis M. Rider’s daughter, Judy Rider Woodbury, provided the information on both of the men. Her address is 8580 E. Sells Drive, Scottsdale, Arizona 85251; mj2511az@cox.net ; 480-945-3180. See also Hollis M. Rider’s entry in this Roll of Honor. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

RYAN, James Kirby

RYAN, James Kirby. a) Seattle, Washington. b) Aug.-Nov. 43, B/63/13. c) Fall 1944, ETO. g) Leo S. Jensen, 195 Horseshoe Circle, Athens, Georgia 30605, in same company at Fannin.

SACCO, Ignatius N.

SACCO, Ignatius N., Pvt. a) Santa Clara, California b) completed basic 12 February 1944, 54th Bn., 11th Regt. c) 5 July 1944, near Beau Coudray, Normandy, France. d) B/357/90 e) KIA enemy artillery shell fragment. Stanton: The 90th Infantry Division’s 359th Regiment attached to the 4th Infantry Division assaulted Utah Beach, France on 6 June 1944, The remainder of the division including the 357th Regiment attacked 10 June 1944 and the division halted in the Golleville-Urville area 17 June 1944 after heavy combat. On 3 July 1944, advancing in heavy rain, the division attacked south down the west coast of the Contentin Peninsula and fought the battle of La Haye-du-Puits-Mont Castre Forest 6-10 July 1944. f) Santa Clara Catholic Cemetery, Santa Clara, California. g) Catherine Sacco, grandniece, katiesacco82@hotmail.com. h) Ignatius Sacco’s uniform shows that at some point he was a sergeant in some other military organization.

SAIKI, Masami

SAIKI, Masami d) L/100/442 RCT (Nisei).

SANTORE, William

SANTORE, William, Pvt. c) 11 May 45, Okinawa. g) Mrs. Earl (Katherine A.) Park, 12821 McGowan Drive, Tyler, Texas 75707-9665, from 1946 Rayen Annual, Youngstown, Ohio, Dedication Biographies.

SAPPINGTON, John H.

SAPPINGTON, John H., Pvt., 36682085. a) Chicago, Illinois. b) Aug.-Nov. 43, D/63/13. c) 17 December 1944, near Elsenborn Ridge, Belgium. d) I/393/99. e) from Dauntless: A History of the 99th Infantry Division, by William C. C. Cavanagh: “When Kampfgruppe Muller forced the 3rd Bn. to yield ground, two platoons of Company I, 393rd Infantry joined with Company M to regain the lost ground. They were unable to regain it and were barely able to hold their own in the face of enemy tanks. Four bazooka teams moved forward. A Panther closed on the Company M command post and shot up the Company M mess tent. Staff Sergeant Chester E. Kroll, a section leader with the 2nd Heavy Machine Gun Platoon of Company M, witnessed the clash with the Panther: ‘A Tiger [the Panther] tank crept up on us and fired point blank. One of our guns opened up on the tank and buttoned it up and knocked out some of the infantry that followed. The gun was manned by Private Sappington and Private Stallman. The tank scored a lucky hit on our machine gun, killing Sappington. Stallman survived without a scratch.’ Stanton: The 99th Infantry Division landed at Le Havre, France on 3 November 1944 and assembled at Aubel, Belgium, and entered the line north of the Roer River between Schmidt and Monschau on 9 November 1944. After a period of defensive patrolling, the division attacked toward the Roer and Urft Dams on 13 December 1944 against heavy resistance from the West Wall. On 16 December 1944 the German Ardennes Counteroffensive hit the division which was partially surounded and suffered heavy losses before Elsenborn Ridge. f) Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery, Belgium, Plot F, Row 1, Grave 63. g) Leon W. St. Pierre, 3325 Bain Place, Tyler, Texas 75701-8871, in the same company at Fannin and in combat with the 99th at the same time.

SAVARD, Godfrey J.

SAVARD, Godfrey J., 2nd Lt., 01688296 a) Quebec, Canada; entered Army from Connecticut. b) Not known; information states only that he served at Camp Fannin. c) October 22, 1945, Leghorn (Livorno), Italy. d) 703rd Engineer Petroleum Distribution Company. e) No information provided; served 16 months heavy combat with A/339/85, promoted from private to tech sergeant in a year, then commissioned. He was then reassigned to the 703rd when 85th rotated home at the end of the war. f) American Cemetery, Florence, Italy, Plot C, Row 3, Grave 9. g) Source of information: <http://www.geocities.com/carl123.geo/soldats.html> and American Battle Monuments Commission. h) Awards: Silver Star Medal (left), two Bronze Stars, French Croix d’Guerre with palm, Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

SCHWARTZ, Raymond A.

SCHWARTZ, Raymond A., Private, 37598537. d) K/126/32. Additional infonnation pending.

SCHUESSLER, Frank A.

SCHUESSLER, Frank A., PFC, 33925290. a) Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. b) Sept-Dec 1944, 58/12. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666, a fellow-trainee at Fannin.

SCOTT, Charles F.

SCOTT, Charles F., S/Sgt. a) California. c) 15 Nov. 44, Ancerville, France. d) F/315/79 e) Stanton: “An all-out divisional assault forced a German withdrawal from the [Foret de Parroy] with the final capture of the road on the main road junction 9 Oct. 44. The division next took Embermenil 3 Oct. 44 and battled for the high ground east of the town 15-22 Oct. 44. It was relieved in this area 24 Oct.44. It rested at Luneville and returned to the attack 13 Nov. 44 with the 314th and 315th out of the Montigny area which carried it across the Vezouse…” g) Edgar W. Henley (now deceased), Route 1, Box 66A, Emmet, Arkansas 71835, who wrote: “I was first sergeant of Co. F when S/Sgt. Scott was killed.”

SCOTT, James Dryden

SCOTT, James Dryden. b) late 1943 or early 1944. c) He was killed in Europe during the crossing of the Rhine. He was a glider infantryman. f) U. S. Military Cemetery, Margraten, Holland. g) son, James D. Scott, Jr., 938 South Alamo Road, #1, Alamo, Texas 78516-9521.

SERSHA, John Paul

SERSHA, John Paul, Private, 37580467 a) Leonidas (Leoneth), Minnesota. b) January-May(?), 1944, D/56/12. c) 27 September 1944, Kiekberg Forest near Groesbeek, Holland. d) Co. F/325 th Glider Inf. Regt./82nd Airborne Div. e) In Operation Market Garden (17-25 September 1944), the 325 th Glider Infantry Regiment was towed on 23 September to the Netherlands with landing zones n.ear Overasselt. Originally tlie 325tl1 was to be towed on the third day of operation, but due to the weather, they were delaye-0 until the 23 rd . Ou 27 September, in an attack on Kiekberg Forest, John Sersha became missing in action. His body was never recovered and he was officially declared killed in action on 27 September.

The Market Garden Operation is the .subject of the film A Bridge Too Far. g) Richard A. Lohry, nephew, 9181 Pihlaja Road, Angora, Minnesota 55703-8249 who provided the following additional infonnation on 12 November 2014: John became MIA on his first com bat mission in the Market Garden Operation. He was declared KIA in 1945. His remains were not recovered and his name is on the Wall Of Remembrance in the Margraten Military Cemetery in the Netherlands, However, last November, the day after installing a memorial paver in the Virginia, Minnesota War Memorial with John’s name, etc., I was contacted by Mr. Danny Keay in Germany. He is semi-retired from the army and is a military archaeologist. In going over X Files and also IDPF files he discovered that John’s remains may have been found in 1948. They are now buried in a numbered grave in Neuville, Belgium [Ardennes American Cemetery and Memorial). I am currently trying to obtain an exhumation order for DNA analysis.

John’s brother Paul and I have submitted DNA samples to the military lab. I have copies of the files and it appears that the forensic evidence, and especially the circumstantial evidence warrants the exhumation order. If in fact a positive ID is made, the remains will be reburied with full military honors at any cemetery in the world. I am hoping that this takes place while his remaining older brother Paul, now 95, is still alive.

SHELBY, Lloyd, Jr.

SHELBY, Lloyd, Jr. c) 4 June 45, Camp Fannin. e) Fatal accident. Lloyd died of gun wounds received during practice. g) Loren Benden, 2232 SO 186 Omaha, NE, 68130

lloyd shelby jr

SHERMAN, Nathan Gilbert

SHERMAN, Nathan Gilbert, PFC, 33664113. a) Cross Keys, Virginia. b) Sept.-Dec. 44, C/64/13 and C/58/12. c) 11 Feb. 45, Germany. d) C/318/80. e) Stanton: After massive artillery preparation, the 80th Division attacked across the Our and Sauer on 7 Feb. 45 with the 319th Inf. at Wallendorf and the 318th near Dillingen. The heavy fire from the West Wall positions and swift current combined to prevent any bridging. As the West Wall fortifications and pillboxes were slowly reduced the bridgehead was expanded. f) Luxembourg American Cemetery; reinterred St. Paul’s Cemetery, Grottoes, Virginia. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666, who trained in the same company at Fannin, and offers a roster including Nathan Sherman’s name. See page 3, February 2003 issue of Camp Fannin Guidon. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

SHEWCRAFT, Herman C.

SHEWCRAFT, Herman C., PFC, 35815761. a) Kentucky. b) Sept.-Dec. 44, C/64/13 and C/58/12. c) 29 April 45, Germany. d) 71/44. e) Stanton: “On 25 April 45 … the 71st Inf. Regt. crossed the Iller at Dietenheim and cleared Voehringen. The [44th] Div. then followed the 10th Armd. Div. and cleared Fuessen and Wertach on 28 April 45…and rushed through the Fern Pass and entered the Inn Valley.” f) Lorraine American Cemetery, St. Avold, France, Plot E, Row 21, Grave 34. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666, who trained in the same company at Fannin, and offers a roster including Herman Shewcraft’s name. See page 3, February 2003 issue of Camp Fannin Guidon.

SHOUSE, James Aubrey

SHOUSE, James Aubrey, PFC, date of birth May 30, 1925. a) Dublin, Virginia. b) Fall 1943. c) September 12, 1944, France. f) New Dublin Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Dublin, Virginia. g) Shane Olson, Adjutant, 9th District Sons of American Legion, 216 Railroad Avenue South, Halma, Minnesota 56729-2908, who learned of his death while researching for soldiers killed during the war. h) Entered the Army September 4, 1943, trained at Camp Fannin and Fort George G. Meade, Maryland, Served in Italy and France. Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge

SIEK, Leonard O.

SIEK, Leonard O., PFC, 35845850, DOB 2/6/1919. a) Pemberville, Ohio. b) July-November 1944, B/66/14. c) March 17, 1945, Luzon, near Norton’s Knob. d) H/27/25. e) Stanton: The 25th Division redeployed to La Paz and prepared to assault the Caraballo Mountains. The offensive was initiated 21 Feb. 45 as the division drove up Highway 5 toward Balete Pass. On 15 Mar. 45 the division began the battle for Norton’s Knob where entrenched Japanese repulsed attacks for the next ten days. f) Re-buried 8/18/1948 in New Albany National Cemetery, Ind., Sect. F, Site 129. g) Paul Rolf, a hometown friend, who was inducted with Leonard, trained with him at Camp Fannin, and fought with him on Luzon. “As I went through his company when my recon troop was relieved,” Paul writes, “I asked about him and was told he was killed in the battle leading to the Congo Fortress.” Additional information from Shane Olson, Halma, Minn., and Patricia M. Hock, Kentucky National Cemetery Complex. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

SIMS, Ralph D., Jr.

SIMS, Ralph D., Jr., PFC, 18169673. a) Hazen, Arkansas. b) Fall 1943, D/66/14. c) 18 Nov. 44, approaches to Metz, France. d) 2/5 e) Stanton: On 12 Nov. 1944, the 5th Infantry Division returned to the assault [on Metz] and was counterattacked at once as it entered the bridgehead of the 6th Armd. Div. Over the next few days, the 2nd Inf. took Ancerville. f) Lorraine American Cemetery, St. Avold, France, Plot C, Row 28, Grave 59. g) Mrs. Kim Groff, 6414 Shoreline Drive, Little Elm, Texas 75068, phone (972) 294-8160, e-mail <kgroff@sbcglobal,net>.

Mrs. Groff is author of The Fitzgerald House, which memorializes the home at 815 South Broadway Avenue in Tyler where Mrs. Lois Whiteman welcomed so many Fannin service men during the war. Mrs. Groff discovered letters to Mrs. Whiteman from many whom she had befriended including Ralph D. Sims, Jr. Many of his letters appear in her book, including a final one dated 12 Nov. 44, saying “It’s cold here, and those big feet of mine just can’t seem to stay warm. Otherwise, I’m fine.” Additional information provided in July 2009 by Shane Olson of Halma, Minnesota. h) Excerpts from his obituary in the Hazen paper: “Ralph was a graduate of Hazen High School and president and valedictorian of the class of 1940. He graduated from Arkansas State Teachers College with a BS in chemistry, was president of the student council and of his freshman class and was listed in Who’s Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges. Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

SMITH, George A.

SMITH, George A., Pvt., 36486831. a) Midland, Michigan. c) June 23, 1945, near Aparri, Luzon, Philippines. d) 511th Parachute Infantry Regiment or 457th Parachute Field Artillery Battalion, both of the 11th Airborne Division. e) From a communication from Randy Brandt, husband of Bonnie J. Hollis, niece of George A. Smith: “Family recollections of what they were told of his last parachute jump most closely resemble the 511th and 457th drop near Aparri, northern Luzon , as part of the Gypsy Task Force on or about June 23, 1945. Poor weather conditions resulted in more than 70 casualties including two dead. Based on what I know now, one of those two probably was Pvt. George A. Smith.” f) Midland, Michigan. g) Randolph D. Brandt, <Brandt.randolph@gmail.com> , (262) 681-9361. h) From letter cited above: “George Smith’s service and death remain an important part of family memory and traditions. My wife’s father Thomas J. Smith flew an American flag in his yard every day in honor of his brother up until his own death in 1999 and we’ve continued the practice to this day.” Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

SMITH, Jack

SMITH, Jack. a) Dallas, Texas. b) July-Nov 43, B/63/13. c) Leyte, Philippine Islands, Oct or Nov 44. d) A/718 Amph Tractor Bn., attached to 77th Inf Div. e) Made the initial assault on Leyte, killed by enemy fire while on patrol. The 718th Amphibian Tractor Battalion took part in the raids deep behind Japanese lines on Leyte in late 1944 and early 1945. g) William J. Reilly, 93 Park Ave., Unit 1504, Danbury, Connecticut 06810, friend from Camp Fannin who served in the same unit overseas. Additional information provided by Shane Olson, Halma, Minnesota. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

SMITH, Rufus

SMITH, Rufus, Pvt., 36882849. a) Michigan. b) October 1943-? c) 11 September 1944, vicinity Aachen, Germany. d) 18th Inf. Regt., 1st Inf. Div. e) Stanton: The 1st Inf. Div. crossed the Meuse River at Liege, Belgium 9 September 1944, reached the German border, and laid siege to the fortress-city of Aachen. f) Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery, Belgium, Plot E, Row 15, Grave 28. g) Great- greatniece, at jenntatro@cox.net. h) Silver Star Medal (left), Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

SNOOK, Ivan J.

SNOOK, Ivan J., Pfc, 37678681. a) Newton, Iowa. b) A/67/14, finished training February 1944. c) 3 April 1945, Luzon. d) 158 (Bushmasters)/Separate. e) Stanton: Attached to 11th Airborne Division 3-24 March 1945, began offensive to open Balayan and Batangas Bays on 5 March 1945, and after heavy combat, cleared the Calumpan Peninsula by 16 March 1945; attached to the XIV Corps 25 March, assaulted Legaspi area of Bicol Peninsula, Luzon 1 April 1945 and battled for ridge near Daraga 1-9 April 1945. g) Robert G. Myers, 917 South 2nd Ave. W, Newton, Iowa 50208, who trained in the same battalion at Fannin.

SPAGNA, Dominick B.

SPAGNA, Dominick B. f) American Military Cemetery, Henri-Chapelle, Belgium. g) Terry Hirsch, Indianapolis, Indiana. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge. Posted 3 February 2016. More infonnation to come.

SPEESE, Andrew Jackson III

SPEESE, Andrew Jackson III, Private, 38544452, date ofbirth 8/10/12. a) Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. b) 27 October 1943-March 1944, D/68/14. c) 6 July 1944, Beaucoudray (Le Plessis-Lastelle), Normandy, France. d) Co. K/3rd Bn/357th Inf. Regt/90th Inf. Div. e) Andrew Jackson Speese III joined his unit on June 14, 1944; subsequent action is described thus: Stanwn: The division halted in die Golleville-Urville area 17 June at/er heavy combat and wok up defensive positions. Advancing in heavy rain, the division attacked 3 July south down the west coast of the Cotentin Peninsula and fought the battle of La Haye-du-Puits-Mont Castre Forest 6-10 July.

Andrew Jackson Speese III his life was a part of the formidable “battle of the hedgerows” in the earliest days following D-Day. He died of a penetrating head wound and traumatic amputation of an arm caused by artillery shell fragments. f) First buried at “!es Forges”, Blosville, France, then at Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial, Plot F, Row 21, Grave 36. g) His son, Andrew Jackson Speese, Jr., 1105 Lunaanela St, Kailua, Honolulu County, Hawaii 96734. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge. He was functioning as platoon sergeant at the time of his death. There is a statue of Andrew Jackson Speese III in Periers, France as part of a memorial to the 90th Infantry Division. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

STARR, Donald R.

STARR, Donald R. d) Member of the 3rd Battalion, 401st Glider Infantry Regiment, which served as the 3rd Battalion of the 325th GIR, 82nd Airborne Division. f) American Military Cemetery, Henri-Chapelle, Belgium. g) Terry Hirsch, Indianapolis, Indiana. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge. Posted 3 February 2016. More information to come.

STROUSE, Liston

STROUSE, Liston, Pvt. c) 18 June 45, Luzon, P.I. d) L/148/37. e) Killed by machine gun fire while attacking a Japanese strong point. g) Don Ely, RR 1, Cornell, Illinois 61319-9801. Don says he did not know deceased but that they were in the same company, probably in another platoon.

SWANN, Ferdinand R.

SWANN, Ferdinand R., Pvt. a) Doniphan, Missouri. b) D/52/11. c) 22 June 44, France. d) B/23/2. e) Stanton: “The [2nd] Div. landed on the evening of 7 June 44 across Omaha Beach and was committed in the Foret de Cerisy and next attacked across the Elle and Aure Rivers. It assaulted the German strongpoint position on top of Hill 192 which commanded the approaches to St. Lo on 12 June 44. Fierce fighting for Hill 192 continued through June.” f) Normandy American Cemetery. g) Howard H. Hoblet, 6628 Tully-Harrison Road, Convoy, Ohio 45832, company clerk D/52/11 both at Camp Robinson, Arkansas and Camp Fannin. Learned of deceased’s death from Letter 4, dated Jan. 1, 1945, sent out to former members of D/52/11 by John B. Culbertson, then stationed in Ft. Meade, Md. Further information from Ferdinand R. Swann’s grand niece, Tanya Banderman, tjband@msn.com.

SWISHER, Robert Benjamin

SWISHER, Robert Benjamin, Pvt. a) Kirksville, Missouri. b) Aug. 44-Jan. 45. c) 28 April 45, Luzon, P.I. f) Greencastle Cemetery, Green City, Missouri. g) Walter D. Straight, 3101 S. Route O, Columbia, Missouri 65203-9281, who writes: “The Swisher boys, Carroll and Robert, are cousins. They were inducted together, trained in the same company at Camp Fannin, home on leave together Christmas 1944, went overseas together, both severely wounded together, in same hospital, where Robert died.”

TAYLOR, Robert R.

TAYLOR, Robert R., Cpl., 38545302. a) Corrigan, Texas. b) Winter-Spring 1944, D/62/13, transferred in April 1944 to A/56/12. c) 7 August 1944, Anzo, France. d) 110/28. e) Stanton: “The 28th Infantry Division landed in Normandy, France on 22 July 1944 and entered the hedgerow struggle north and west of St. Lo. Advancing slowly against determined German defenders, it took Percy 1 August 1944 and overran Gathemo with 2nd Armored Division assistance on 10 August 1944.” f) U. S. Military Cemetery, Le Chene-Guerin, 14 miles south of St. Lo, Plot E, Row 6, Grave 113. Repatriated and buried on or about 29 April 1949 at Union Springs Cemetery, Corrigan (Polk County), Texas. g) Niece, Joyce Mosley, 6103 Egypt, Pasadena, Texas 77505, garyjoyce925@hotmail.com. h) Mrs. Mosley, three years old at the time of her uncle’s death, says “I remember my mother receiving a late-night telegram and sitting down on the side of the bed and crying. I remember going to Robert’s funeral after his body was returned to Corrigan, Texas.”

TENLEY, William H.

TENLEY, William H. a) Iowa. c) 1944, Leyte, P.I. f) Stanwood, Iowa. g) Mrs. Janet Taylor, Kilgore, Texas, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Percy Werner of Tyler, transmitted by Mrs. Ruby Neilson, Gordon’s widow, 417 Bond St., Hillsboro, Texas 76645-2332. Ruby writes: “Mrs. Taylor got hold of guest register from the First Baptist Church, Tyler, signed during the war, and began to try to track the signees. She took the state of Iowa as her project. She had really fantastic results. The people of Iowa are so helpful and friendly. Some of the newspapers, Chambers of Commerce, country clerks, etc. wrote to say that they knew some of the veterans, including William H. Tenley, were deceased.” See also story about Mrs. Taylor in Camp Fannin Guidon, Spring 1997 issue, page 2, “God Bless The Children”.

THOMAS, Carl

THOMAS, Carl, Pvt. b) Aug-Dec 43, A/81. c) 20 Oct 44, Leyte, P.I. g) Eric Diller, 504 Via La Selva, Redondo Beach, CA 90277; (310) 375-2024; eddiller@earthlink.net; in same barracks with deceased at Camp Fannin.

THOMAS, Raymond P.

THOMAS, Raymond P., Sgt., 31389683. a) Massachusetts. b) D/52/11. c) 18 Dec. 44, France. d) 30/3. e) Stanton: “The [3rd] Div. emerged from the Vosges onto the Alsatian Plain and entered Strasbourg 27 Nov. 44. On 5 Dec. 44 the division began its attack toward the Maginot Line and cleared Bennwihr 24 Dec. 44.” f) Epinal American Cemetery, France, Plot B, Row 41, Grave 1. g) Howard H. Hoblet, 6628 Tully-Harrison, Convoy, Ohio 45832, company clerk D/52/11 both at Camp Robinson, Arkansas and Camp Fannin. Learned of Raymond Thomas’s death from Letter 4, dated 1 Jan. 45, sent out to former members of D/52/11 by John B. Culbertson, then stationed at Ft. Meade, Md

TIEMANN, Edgar B. ("Boots")

TIEMANN, Edgar B. (“Boots”). b) March-Sept. 44. c) 17 April 45, Tanne, Germany. d) L/3/16/1. e) Excerpts from letter from daughter, Patricia Tiemann Fabri: “He was wounded in the Battle of Hurtgen Forest on 23 Nov. 44, sent to England for surgery and rehabilitation and back to his unit in March 45.” Stanton: “On 8 April 45 the [1st] Division was called up to force the Weser River after the 3rd Armd Div had reached it only to find all the bridges blown. The 16th and 18th Infantry Regiments expanded the bridgehead . With the 4th Cavalry Group attached, the division was tasked with mopping up along the edge of the Harz Mountains. The bypassed German troops were encircled commencing 12 April 45 and organized resistance ended by 20 April 45.” g) Daughter, Patricia Tiemann Fabri, 3715 W. Calavar Rd., Phoenix, Arizona 85053. h) Deceased was 32 at time of death.

TINKER, Eugene

TINKER, Eugene, Pvt., 31401988. a) Maine. b) Sept.-Dec. 44, C/64/13 and C/58/12. c) 26 Feb. 45, Luxembourg. d) I/304/76. e) Stanton: “The [76th] Div. crossed the Pruem River 24-25 Feb. 45 and regrouped, as the 304th Inf. Regt. crossed the Nims at

TROTTER, George I. ("GI")

TROTTER, George I. (“GI”). a) Iowa. b) C/64/13. c) Aug. 44, Italy. g) Edgar W. Henley, Route 1, Box 66A, Emmet, Arkansas 71835. Edgar and “GI” were fellow cadremen in C/64/13, along with another Roll of Honor hero, Wayne W. Dahlstedt. The three are shown together in a 1944 photo, printed on page 3 of the Fall 1999 issue of Camp Fannin Guidon.

TUCKER, Raymond J.

TUCKER, Raymond J., PFC, 35907914. a) Indiana. b) Sept.-Dec. 44, C/64/13 and C/58/12. c) 16 March 45, Germany. d) F/276/70. e) Stanton: “Divisional patrols reached the outposts of the West Wall on 6 Mar 45. The German forces withdrew 13 March 45 and the division began pursuit operations immediately, driving north to the Saar and crossing into Germany 14 March 45. Saarbruecken was attacked on 15 March 45.” f) Lorraine American Cemetery, St. Avold, France, Plot E, Row 6, Grave 10. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666. See also item “Rosters Available” on page 3 of the February 2003 issue of Camp Fannin Guidon.

VEIL, William T.

VEIL, William.T., PFC, 33762987. a) Johnstown, Pennsylvania. b) July-Dec. 43. c) 23 June 1944, near Cherbourg, France. d) 8/4. e) Stanton: The 4th Div. , reinforced by the 359th Inf. of the 90th Inf. Div., assaulted Utah Beach, France with the 8th Inf. leading 6 June 44. The 8th Inf. Regt. relieved the isolated 82nd Airborne Div. at Ste. Mere-Eglise and countered several German attacks 7 June 44. The following day the division began its drive on the Cotentin Peninsula toward Cherbourg, and the 22nd Inf. Regt. took Azeville fort and Ozeville 9 June 44 with naval gunfire support. The division reached Cherbourg’s main defenses by 21 June 44 and on 22 June 44 began its assault . On 25 June 44 it breached the fortress city and garrisoned it until relieved at the end of the month by the 101st Airborne Division.” f) Normany American Cemetery, St. Laurent-sur-Mer, France. g) Emory A. Domen, 1990 Minno Drive, Johnstown, PA 15905-1172, who writes: “William Veil lived a quarter-mile from my home and was housed in the barracks next to mine during 17 weeks of basic training at Fannin. I have been to France many times and always paid my respects to his final resting place.” Additional information provided by Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666.

WALDO, Duane

WALDO, Duane, PFC. a) Kalamazoo, Michigan. b) July-Sept. 43. c) January 1945, Battle of the Bulge. d) 17th Airborne Division. e) Stanton: ” The 17th Airborne Division was flown to the Reims area of France 23-25 Dec. 44 by emergency night flights and assembled at Mourmelon. The division defended the Meuse River from Givet to Verdun 27-31 Dec. 44 and relieved the 28th Inf. Div. in the Neufchateau area 1 Jan. 45. It attacked 3 Jan 45 five miles northwest of Bastogne and was strongly opposed at Dead Man’s Ridge, capturing Rechrival and Flamierge on 7 Jan. 45. The division gained then lost the high ground north of Laval and was forced out of Flamierge by German counterattack on 8 Jan. 45. On 11 Jan. 45 the German forces commenced withdrawal and the division moved up to retake Flamierge the next day.

Salle fell without opposition on 13 Jan. 45, and the following day the 507th Parachute Infantry (attached) secured Bertogne while the 194th Glider Inf. took Givroulle and the division reached the Ourthe River. It took over the Hardingny-Houffalize line on 18 Jan. 45 and by 20 Jan. 45 had advanced beyond Tavigny. Steinbach and Limerle were occupied 22 Jan. 45 and the division continued behind the retreating Germans to take Espeler and Wattermal by 26 Jan. 45, when it was relieved by the 87th Inf. Div.” f) Kalamazoo, Michigan. g) Joseph H. Quade, 4 Cain Court, Montville, New Jersey 02045, who was at Camp Fannin at the same time as Duane Waldo and also attended M.I.T. with him in the ASTP program. Joe Quade is also a 17th A/B Div. combat vet and editor of the Division Association’s publication, Thunder From Above. Purple Heart,
Combat Infantry Badge.

WALSH, Robert

WALSH, Robert, PFC, 31435231. a) Massachusetts. c) 6 April 45, Germany. d) 290/75. e) Stanton: “The 75th Inf. Div. attacked across the Dortmund-Ems Canal at Waltrop on 4 April 45 and began clearing the approaches to Dortmund. The division was reinforced by the 320th Inf. Regt. and reached the Ruhr at Witten with four regiments, taking two bridges intact on 11 April 45.” f) Netherlands American Cemetery, Margraten, Netherlands, Plot P, Row 20, Grave 16. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666. h) Won Air Medal with Gold Star.

WEBER, Robert E.

WEBER, Robert E., Pvt., 36918499. a) Pontiac, Illinois. b) Oct. 1944-March 1945, D/51/11. c) 15 April 1945, Torfhaus, Germany. d) H/26/1. e) Per letter from Pvt. Weber’s company commander, 1st Lt. Paul C. Heath, to his father, Walter C. Weber: “On the 15th day of April 1945, you son’s company was assigned the mission of cutting a German-held road in the vicinity of Torfhaus, Germany. As the attack progressed, the company encountered enemy tanks which were set up as a defense against our advancing elements. Heavy fire was exchanged by both sides, and it was during this engagement that your son, while carrying ammunition for his machine gun squad, was killed by shrapnel from an exploding shell fired by an enemy tank. As his commanding officer, I want to assure you that he died as a soldier, fighting on the field of battle against the enemies of our country. He was killedinstantly with no suffering or lingering pain.” f) American Military Cemetery near Ittenbach, Germany; re-interred Patty Cemetery, Pontiac, Illinois. g) Donald and Jo Ely, RR #1, Cornell, Illinois 61319

WELSH, Burl W. Jr.

WELSH, Burl W. Jr. Pvt., 38687328. a) Oklahoma b) 1944 c) 22 April 1945, Okinawa f) Turlock, California. g) <http://www.cagenweb.com/lr/stanislaus/staniobit.html> .

WENNER, Carl Finley

WENNER, Carl Finley, Pvt., 33940037. a) Knox, Pennsylvania. b) May-Oct. 44, D/51/11. c) 10 Dec. 44, Saarlautern, Germany. d) 379/95. e) Stanton: “The 379th Inf. Regt. battled into Saarlautern and crossed the bridge there 4 Dec. 44, driving into the West Wall. In house-to-house fighting and combat through mazes of pillboxes, the Saarlautern Bridgehead Battles commenced the same day. The 379th and 377th fought the Battle of Fraulautern, and the 379th fought the Battle for Saarlautern-Roden, until the division was relieved in line on 18 Dec. as the 5th Inf. Div. took over the fighting.” f) Lorraine American Cemetery, St. Avold, France, Plot B, Row 23, Grave 11. g) Widow, Marie E. Wenner, Rt. 1, Cranberry, Pennsylvania 16319-9801. h) Carl Wenner was 31 years old and the father of four children at his death.

WILDEVELD, Simion G.

WILDEVELD, Simion G., Pvt., 36915611. a) Cook County, Illinois. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666.

WRIGHT, Ralph E.

WRIGHT, Ralph E., PFC, 38687793. a) Cooper, Texas. b) May-Oct. 44. c) 18 Jan. 45, German POW facility. d) L/315/79. e) Ralph Wright died while a prisoner of war as the result of wounds received in action 11 January. Stanton: “The 79th Div. reached the Lauter River at Schiebenhardt on 15 Dec. 44 and held defensive lines at Wissembourg until 2 Jan. 45. It then moved to the southern portion of the Rhine River. The Germans established a bridgehead at Gambsheim and by 6 Jan. the division had battled through Stattmatten to relieve encircled elements of the task force. German attacks forced the 315th Inf. out of Hatten and Rittershoffen, and by 12 Jan. the 14th Armd Div and 103rd Inf Div were committed to the battle.” f) U.S. Military Cemetery, St. Avold, France. g) Widow, Doris Toon Alley, 3177 Hwy. 154, Cooper, Texas 75432.

YEAPLE, Andrew Z.

YEAPLE, Andrew Z., PFC, 42001056. a) New Jersey. b) July-Oct. 43, C/63/13. c) 13 Dec. 44, near the German West Wall. Elsenborn nearest large town. d) B/395/99. e) Ltr. from Robert R. Pierce: ” During our attack on fortified positions of the West Wall, Andy was killed.” Stanton: “The 99th Div. landed at Le Havre, France on 3 Nov. 44 and assembled at Aubel, Belgium, and entered the line north of the Roer River between Schmidt and Monschau on 9 Nov. After a period of defensive patrolling, the division attacked toward the Roer and Urft Dams on 13 Dec. against heavy resistance from the West Wall.” f) Henri Chappelle Military Cemetery, Belgium, Plot D, Row 10, Grave 37. g) Robert R. Pierce, 9420 – 37 Ave. S.W., Seattle, Washington 98126, who writes: “Andy and I went through basic training together at Fannin, then were together in the ASTP program at Louisiana State University. We were sent to the 99th Inf. Div. in March of 1944, and were subsequently assigned to the same squad in B/395/99. I had a chance to visit his gravesite in 1989.”

ZACHARY, Harry

ZACHARY, Harry, PFC, 39417993. a) Fresno, California. b) Sept. 43-Feb. 44, C/52/11. c) 30 Oct. 44, France. d) 157/45. e) Stanton: “The 157 Inf. Regt. took Girmont 24 Sept. 44 and the division entered the western foothills of the Vosges. After severe fighting, Bruyeres fell 19 Oct. and after several attempts managed a bridgehead across the Morgagne near Fremifontaine 22-23 Oct. As the division was pushing slowly toward Raon-l’Etape west of the Meurthe. It was relieved 1-9 Nov and moved to a rest area.” f) Epinal American Cemetery, France, Plot B, Row 12, Grave 10. g) Winston A. Bailey, 27211, Cranford Lane, Dearborn Heights, Michigan 48127, who writes: “Harry was a dear best friend. We took basic training together, same platoon. Looking for Harry, I visited his mother after the war and she told me that he had been killed.”

ZANG, Robert J.

ZANG, Robert J., PFC., 36915409 a) Muskegon Heights, Michigan. b) D/61/13. c) 9 June 1945, Okinawa. f) Norton Cemetery, Norton Shores, Michigan. g) Thomas Vermilya, Jr., 3808 Pontaluna Road, Fruitport, Michigan 49415, who wrote: “We trained together at Fannin and Fort Ord, and went to Hawaii where we were separated. I learned of his death by a letter from home.”

ZEIGLER, Clarence L

ZEIGLER, Clarence L., Sr. b) D/52/11. c) Anzio. g) Howard H. Hoblet, 6628 Tully-Harrison Road, Convoy, Ohio 45832, company clerk D/52/11 both at Camp Robinson, Arkansas and Camp Fannin. Learned of deceased’s death from Letter 4, dated Jan. 1, 1945, sent out to former members of D/52/11 by John B. Culbertson, then stationed in Ft. Meade, Md.

Camp Fannin Honor Roll Nomination

Infantry Replacement Training Center U. S. Army, 1943-46
Men and women who died in the service of their country in World War II who had been stationed at Camp Fannin, Texas.

Nominee Information

Information about the person you are nominating.
Name of Nominee(Required)
Do you believe or know for certain that the service man or woman whose name appears above was stationed at Camp Fannin, Texas during World War II?(Required)
Do you believe or know for certain that that the service man or woman whose name appears above died in the service of (his)(her) country during World War II?(Required)
Date of Death
Max. file size: 64 MB.

Nominator Information

Your information.
Your Name(Required)
Address(Required)
This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.